The Art of War: A New Translation by Michael Nylan [EPUB]

The Art of War: A New Translation by Michael Nylan [EPUB]
The Art of War: A New Translation by Sun Tzu, translated by Michael Nylan
2020 | EPUB | ISBN: 9781324004899 | 3.78MB

For the first time in any modern language, a female scholar and translator reimagines The Art of War.

Sun Tzu’s ancient book of strategy and psychology has as much to tell us today as when it was first written 2,500 years ago. In a world forever at odds, his rules for anticipating the motivations and strategies of our competitors never cease to inspire leaders of all kinds.

Michael Nylan, in her provocative introduction, sees new and unexpected lessons to be learned from The Art of War―in business ventures, relationships, games of skill, academic careers, and medical practices. Strategy, like conflict, is woven into society’s very roots.

Nylan’s crisp translation “offers a masterly new evaluation of this classic work, which balances the overtly military content with a profound and thought-provoking analysis” (Olivia Milburn). Readers newly engaging with ancient Chinese culture will be inspired by Nylan’s authoritative voice. Informed by years of scholarly study, Nylan is uniquely placed to introduce readers to Sun Tzu’s classic work through her detailed annotations on culture and the intricacies of translating ancient Chinese into modern English. She proves that Sun Tzu is more relevant than ever, helping us navigate the conflicts we know and those we have yet to endure.

The Persian War in Herodotus and Other Ancient Voices [EPUB]

The Persian War in Herodotus and Other Ancient Voices [EPUB]
The Persian War in Herodotus and Other Ancient Voices by William Shepherd
2020 | EPUB | ISBN: 9781472808639 | 109.27MB

Weaving together the accounts of the ancient historian Herodotus with other ancient sources, this is the engrossing story of the triumph of Greece over the mighty Persian Empire.

The Persian War is the name generally given to the first two decades of the period of conflict between the Greeks and the Persians that began in 499 BC and ended around 450. The pivotal moment came in 479, when a massive Persian invasion force was defeated and driven out of mainland Greece and Europe, never to return. The victory of a few Greek city-states over the world's first superpower was an extraordinary military feat that secured the future of Western civilization.

All modern accounts of the war as a whole, and of the best-known battles of Marathon, Thermopylae and Salamis, depend on the ancient sources, foremost among them Herodotus. Yet although these modern narratives generally include numerous references to the ancient authors, they quote little directly from them.

This is the first book to bring together Herodotus' entire narrative and interweave it with other ancient voices alongside detailed commentary to present and clarify the original texts.

The extracts from other ancient writers add value to Herodotus' narrative in various ways: some offer fresh analysis and credible extra detail; some contradict him interestingly; some provide background illumination; and some add drama and color. All are woven into a compelling narrative tapestry that brings this immense clash of arms vividly to life.

Raiders from New France: North American Forest Warfare Tactics, 17th–18th Centuries [EPUB]

Raiders from New France: North American Forest Warfare Tactics, 17th–18th Centuries [EPUB]
Raiders from New France: North American Forest Warfare Tactics, 17th–18th Centuries (Elite) by René Chartrand
2020 | EPUB | ISBN: 9781472833501 | 21.5 MB

Supported by full-color illustrations, this study explores in startling new detail the “musket and tomahawk” forest warfare by which the French colonists and their allies battled to ensure the survival of “New France.”

Though the French and British colonies in North America began on a “level playing field," French political conservatism and limited investment allowed the British colonies to forge ahead, pushing into territories that the French had explored deeply but failed to exploit. The subsequent survival of “New France” can largely be attributed to an intelligent doctrine of raiding warfare developed by imaginative French officers through close contact with indigenous tribes and Canadian settlers. The groundbreaking new research explored in this study indicates that, far from the opportunism these raids seemed to represent, they were in fact the result of a deliberate plan to overcome numerical weakness by exploiting the potential of mixed parties of French soldiers, Canadian backwoodsmen, and allied indigenous warriors.

Supported by contemporary accounts from period documents and newly explored historical records, this study explores the “hit-and-run” raids which kept New Englanders tied to a defensive position and ensured the continued existence of the French colonies until their eventual cession in 1763.