Revolution in the Air: Sixties Radicals Turn to Lenin, Mao and Che [EPUB]

Revolution in the Air: Sixties Radicals Turn to Lenin, Mao and Che [EPUB]
Revolution in the Air: Sixties Radicals Turn to Lenin, Mao and Che by Max Elbaum
2018 | EPUB | 1.9MB

Revolution In The Air is the first in-depth study of the long march of the US New Left after 1968. It tells the story of the ‘new communist movement’ which was the most racially integrated and fast-growing movement on the Left. Thousands of young activists, radicalized by the Vietnam War and Black Liberation, and spurred on by the Puerto Rican, Chicano and Asian-American movements, embraced a Third World oriented version of Marxism. These admirers of Mao, Che and Amilcar Cabral organized resistance to the republican majorities of Nixon and Ford.

By the 1980s these groups had either collapsed or become tiny shards of the dream of a Maoist world revolution. Taking issue with the idea of a division between an early ‘good sixties’ and a later ‘bad sixties,’ Max Elbaum is particularly concerned to reclaim the lessons of the new communist movement for today’s activists who, like their sixties’ predecessors, are coming of age at a time when the Left lacks mass support and is fragmented along racial lines.

This Land Is Our Land: How We Lost the Right to Roam and How to Take It Back [EPUB]

This Land Is Our Land: How We Lost the Right to Roam and How to Take It Back [EPUB]
This Land Is Our Land: How We Lost the Right to Roam and How to Take It Back by Ken Ilgunas
2018 | EPUB | 1.52MB

Private property is everywhere. Almost anywhere you walk in the United States, you will spot “No Trespassing” and “Private Property” signs on trees and fence posts. In America, there are more than a billion acres of grassland pasture, cropland, and forest, and miles and miles of coastlines that are mostly closed off to the public. Meanwhile, America’s public lands are threatened by extremist groups and right-wing think tanks who call for our public lands to be sold to the highest bidder and closed off to everyone else. If these groups get their way, public property may become private, precious green spaces may be developed, and the common good may be sacrificed for the benefit of the wealthy few.

Ken Ilgunas, lifelong traveler, hitchhiker, and roamer, takes readers back to the nineteenth century, when Americans were allowed to journey undisturbed across the country. Today, though, America finds itself as an outlier in the Western world as a number of European countries have created sophisticated legal systems that protect landowners and give citizens generous roaming rights to their countries' green spaces.

Inspired by the United States' history of roaming, and taking guidance from present-day Europe, Ilgunas calls into question our entrenched understanding of private property and provocatively proposes something unheard of: opening up American private property for public recreation. He imagines a future in which folks everywhere will have the right to walk safely, explore freely, and roam boldly—from California to the New York island, from the Redwood Forest to the Gulf Stream waters.

The Bill of Rights: A User's Guide, 5th Edition [EPUB]

The Bill of Rights: A User's Guide, 5th Edition [EPUB]
The Bill of Rights: A User's Guide, 5th Edition by Linda R Monk
2018 | EPUB | 110.59MB

With a foreword by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg of the U.S. Supreme Court.

An Engaging, Accessible Guide to the Bill of Rights for Everyday Citizens.

In The Bill of Rights: A User's Guide, award-winning author and constitutional scholar Linda R. Monk explores the remarkable history of the Bill of Rights amendment by amendment, the Supreme Court's interpretation of each right, and the power of citizens to enforce those rights.

Stories of the ordinary people who made the Bill of Rights come alive are featured throughout. These include Fannie Lou Hamer, a Mississippi sharecropper who became a national civil rights leader; Clarence Earl Gideon, a prisoner whose handwritten petition to the Supreme Court expanded the right to counsel; Mary Beth Tinker, a 13-year-old whose protest of the Vietnam War established free speech rights for students; Michael Hardwick, a bartender who fought for privacy after police entered his bedroom unlawfully; Suzette Kelo, a nurse who opposed the city's takeover of her working-class neighborhood; and Simon Tam, a millennial whose 10-year trademark battle for his band "The Slants" ended in a unanimous Supreme Court victory. Such people prove that, in the words of Judge Learned Hand, "Liberty lies in the hearts of men and women; when it dies there, no constitution, no law, no court, can save it."

Exploring the history, scope, and meaning of the first ten amendments-as well as the Fourteenth Amendment, which nationalized them and extended new rights of equality to all-The Bill of Rights: A User's Guide is a powerful examination of the values that define American life and the tools that every citizen needs.

Winner of the American Bar Association's Silver Gavel Award, its highest honor for media about the law.

pages: 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013
*100: 100 200 300 400