The Poverty Industry: The Exploitation of America's Most Vulnerable Citizens [EPUB]

The Poverty Industry: The Exploitation of America's Most Vulnerable Citizens [EPUB]
The Poverty Industry: The Exploitation of America's Most Vulnerable Citizens by Daniel L Hatcher
2016 | EPUB | 0.9MB

Government aid doesn’t always go where it’s supposed to. Foster care agencies team up with companies to take disability and survivor benefits from abused and neglected children. States and their revenue consultants use illusory schemes to siphon Medicaid funds intended for children and the poor into general state coffers. Child support payments for foster children and families on public assistance are converted into government revenue. And the poverty industry keeps expanding, leaving us with nursing homes and juvenile detention centers that sedate residents to reduce costs and maximize profit, local governments buying nursing homes to take the facilities’ federal aid while the elderly languish with poor care, and counties hiring companies to mine the poor for additional funds in modern day debtor’s prisons.

In The Poverty Industry, Daniel L. Hatcher shows us how state governments and their private industry partners are profiting from the social safety net, turning America’s most vulnerable populations into sources of revenue. The poverty industry is stealing billions in federal aid and other funds from impoverished families, abused and neglected children, and the disabled and elderly poor. As policy experts across the political spectrum debate how to best structure government assistance programs, a massive siphoning of the safety net is occurring behind the scenes.In the face of these abuses of power, Hatcher offers a road map for reforms to realign the practices of human service agencies with their intended purpose, to prevent the misuse of public taxpayer dollars, and to ensure that government aid truly gets to those in need.

Drone Nation: The Political Economy of America's New Way of War [EPUB]

Drone Nation: The Political Economy of America's New Way of War [EPUB]
Drone Nation: The Political Economy of America's New Way of War by Geoff Martin, Erin Steuter
2016 | EPUB | 0.6MB

Drone Nation unveils an unexpected scenario where international drone warfare leads to a state of permanent war through increasing numbers of assassinations of the western world’s declared enemies. It provides historical context for the rise and acceptance of drone warfare and examines likely future impacts. The book discusses the broad political-economic forces at play in the United States.

Topics include US strategic traditions, domestic political institutions, military-industrial complex, intra-military pressures, think tanks, media, and international law. The authors argue that social progress is not necessarily continuous. While there was widespread social and economic progress from the 1950s through 1970s in the United States, the country is now in a period of economic and political regression. The rise of drone warfare, and the domestic use of drones, is partly to blame. This gradual and important change signals a major departure from the traditional embrace of international law, military ethics, and domestic privacy.

Crimes of Peace: Mediterranean Migrations at the World's Deadliest Border [EPUB]

Crimes of Peace: Mediterranean Migrations at the World's Deadliest Border [EPUB]
Crimes of Peace: Mediterranean Migrations at the World's Deadliest Border by Maurizio Albahari
2015 | EPUB | 2.64MB

Among the world's hotly contested, obsessively controlled, and often dangerous borders, none is deadlier than the Mediterranean Sea. Since 2000, at least 25,000 people have lost their lives attempting to reach Italy and the rest of Europe, most by drowning in the Mediterranean. Every day, unauthorized migrants and refugees bound for Europe put their lives in the hands of maritime smugglers, while fishermen, diplomats, priests, bureaucrats, armed forces sailors, and hesitant bystanders waver between indifference and intervention—with harrowing results.

In Crimes of Peace, Maurizio Albahari investigates why the Mediterranean Sea is the world's deadliest border, and what alternatives could improve this state of affairs. He also examines the dismal conditions of migrants in transit and the institutional framework in which they move or are physically confined. Drawing on his intimate knowledge of places, people, and European politics, Albahari supplements fieldwork in coastal southern Italy and neighboring Mediterranean locales with a meticulous documentary investigation, transforming abstract statistics into names and narratives that place the responsibility for the Mediterranean migration crisis in the very heart of liberal democracy. Global fault lines are scrutinized: between Europe, Africa, and the Middle East; military and humanitarian governance; detention and hospitality; transnational crime and statecraft; the universal law of the sea and the thresholds of a globalized yet parochial world. Crimes of Peace illuminates crucial questions of sovereignty and rights: for migrants trying to enter Europe along the Mediterranean shore, the answers are a matter of life or death.

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