Making Public in a Privatized World: The Struggle for Essential Services [PDF]

Making Public in a Privatized World: The Struggle for Essential Services [PDF]
Making Public in a Privatized World: The Struggle for Essential Services edited by David McDonald
2016 | PDF | 1.04MB

In the wake of recent widespread failures of privatization efforts, many communities in the global south now seek new, progressive ways to revitalize the public sector. From rural Guatemalan towns holding the state accountable for public health to an alliance of waste pickers in India and decentralized solar electricity initiatives in Africa, people worldwide are rising up with innovative public service solutions to difficult issues.

Making Public in a Privatized World explores all of these cases and more, with essays that uncover the radically different ways grassroots movements have proved themselves as successful alternatives of essential public services where privatized efforts have failed. Using numerous in-depth case studies, this book offers probing insights from a diverse range of contributors from across the world, including academics, activists, unionists, and social movement organizers. A timely collection, Making Public in a Privatized World addresses the growing worldwide interest in exciting alternatives to privatization in both developed and developing countries.

Disposable People: New Slavery in the Global Economy [EPUB]

Disposable People: New Slavery in the Global Economy [EPUB]
Disposable People: New Slavery in the Global Economy by Kevin Bales
2013 | EPUB | 0.58MB

Slavery is illegal throughout the world, yet more than twenty-seven million people are still trapped in one of history's oldest social institutions. Kevin Bales's disturbing story of slavery today reaches from brick kilns in Pakistan and brothels in Thailand to the offices of multinational corporations. His investigation of conditions in Mauritania, Brazil, Thailand, Pakistan, and India reveals the tragic emergence of a "new slavery," one intricately linked to the global economy. The new slaves are not a long-term investment as was true with older forms of slavery, explains Bales. Instead, they are cheap, require little care, and are disposable.

Three interrelated factors have helped create the new slavery. The enormous population explosion over the past three decades has flooded the world's labor markets with millions of impoverished, desperate people. The revolution of economic globalization and modernized agriculture has dispossessed poor farmers, making them and their families ready targets for enslavement. And rapid economic change in developing countries has bred corruption and violence, destroying social rules that might once have protected the most vulnerable individuals.

Bales's vivid case studies present actual slaves, slaveholders, and public officials in well-drawn historical, geographical, and cultural contexts. He observes the complex economic relationships of modern slavery and is aware that liberation is a bitter victory for a child prostitute or a bondaged miner if the result is starvation.

Bales offers suggestions for combating the new slavery and provides examples of very positive results from organizations such as Anti-Slavery International, the Pastoral Land Commission in Brazil, and the Human Rights Commission in Pakistan. He also calls for researchers to follow the flow of raw materials and products from slave to marketplace in order to effectively target campaigns of "naming and shaming" corporations linked to slavery. Disposable People is the first book to point the way to abolishing slavery in today's global economy.

The Mediated City: The News in a Post-Industrial Context [PDF]

The Mediated City: The News in a Post-Industrial Context [PDF]
The Mediated City: The News in a Post-Industrial Context by Stephen Coleman
2016 | PDF | 1.69MB

Mediated City begins by asking: how does news circulate in a major post-industrial city? To answer, Stephen Coleman analyzes a wide-range of practices involved in producing, circulating, and consuming news, and he examines the various ways and mediums through which individuals and groups may find out about, follow, or discuss local issues and events. He directly critiques the assumptions of many scholars about the centrality of certain news media, and he shows that questions about what news really is and what types of media constitute and deliver it truly matter.

The first book to critically trace the patterns of news circulation within a city, Mediated City is poised to radically change how media scholars consider the local transmission and function of information.

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