An Introduction to the Causes of War: Patterns of Interstate Conflict from World War I to Iraq [EPUB]

An Introduction to the Causes of War: Patterns of Interstate Conflict from World War I to Iraq [EPUB]
An Introduction to the Causes of War: Patterns of Interstate Conflict from World War I to Iraq by Greg Cashman, Leonard C Robinson
2013 | EPUB | 10.72MB

This pioneering book explains the causes of war through a sustained combination of theoretical insights and detailed case studies. Using the major theories of international conflict as a guide to examine contemporary examples of the outbreak of war, Cashman and Robinson find that while all wars have multiple causes, these factors typically combine in identifiable "dangerous patterns." In assessing and comparing these patterns, this is the only undergraduate text to systematically join detailed case studies to the theories and empirical research carried out by political scientists on the causes of war. Through the examples of World War I, World War II in the Pacific, the Six-Day War, the Indo-Pakistani War of 1971, the Iran-Iraq War, and the Iraq War of 2003, the authors uncover the complex multilevel processes by which disputes between countries evolve into bloody conflicts.

They emphasize the importance of escalation through conflict spirals between rival countries. They also point out the links between war and territorial disputes, the underappreciated role of the domestic political environment (especially internal political instability), and the importance of crucial misperceptions by national leaders. The authors identify specific patterns in which disputes escalate: the "classic rivalry spiral," the "domestic instability spiral," and "complex spirals." They also find that wars between states of unequal power follow a starkly different pattern than wars between relative equals. Ideal for a range of courses in international relations, this focused text clearly explains theory and applies it to concrete examples in a way that allows students to fully understand the origins of war.

Just War in Religion and Politics [EPUB]

Just War in Religion and Politics [EPUB]
Just War in Religion and Politics edited by Jacob Neusner, Bruce D Chilton, R E Tully
2013 | EPUB | 2.06MB

The basis of this collection of essays is the reading of a common topic from different perspectives. Half of the book is devoted to the comparative study of religions and the courses are offered by religion professors. The other half is shaped by social science approaches and the seminars are given mainly by social science professors. We aim to compare and contrast not only positions, but also methods of learning. We examine theories of the just war in diverse cultural contexts and their disciplinary settings. Space is devoted to the study of papers prepared for this project by specialists in various disciplines, mainly but not exclusively faculty of Bard College and the United States Military Academy at West Point.

Family Properties: Race, Real Estate, and the Exploitation of Black Urban America [EPUB]

Family Properties: Race, Real Estate, and the Exploitation of Black Urban America [EPUB]
Family Properties: Race, Real Estate, and the Exploitation of Black Urban America by Beryl Satter
2010 | EPUB | 0.92MB

Part family story and part urban history, a landmark investigation of segregation and urban decay in Chicago -- and cities across the nation

The "promised land" for thousands of Southern blacks, postwar Chicago quickly became the most segregated city in the North, the site of the nation's worst ghettos and the target of Martin Luther King Jr.'s first campaign beyond the South. In this powerful book, Beryl Satter identifies the true causes of the city's black slums and the ruin of urban neighborhoods throughout the country: not, as some have argued, black pathology, the culture of poverty, or white flight, but a widespread and institutionalized system of legal and financial exploitation.

In Satter's riveting account of a city in crisis, unscrupulous lawyers, slumlords, and speculators are pitched against religious reformers, community organizers, and an impassioned attorney who launched a crusade against the profiteers—the author's father, Mark J. Satter. At the heart of the struggle stand the black migrants who, having left the South with its legacy of sharecropping, suddenly find themselves caught in a new kind of debt peonage. Satter shows the interlocking forces at work in their oppression: the discriminatory practices of the banking industry; the federal policies that created the country's shameful "dual housing market"; the economic anxieties that fueled white violence; and the tempting profits to be made by preying on the city's most vulnerable population.

Family Properties: Race, Real Estate, and the Exploitation of Black Urban America is a monumental work of history, this tale of racism and real estate, politics and finance, will forever change our understanding of the forces that transformed urban America.

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