Property Is Theft: A Pierre-Joseph Proudhon Anthology

Property Is Theft: A Pierre-Joseph Proudhon Anthology

Property Is Theft: A Pierre-Joseph Proudhon Anthology edited by Iain McKay
2011 | EPUB | 1.05MB

More influential than Karl Marx during his lifetime, Pierre-Joseph Proudon's work has long been out of print or unavailable in English. Iain McKay's comprehensive collection is a much-needed and timely historical corrective.

Pierre-Joseph Proudhon (1809-1869) was one of the most important and influential political theorists of the 19th century. The first person to call himself an anarchist, he is the author of What is Property? An Inquiry into the Principle of Right and of Government; The System of Economical Contradictions (or, the Philosophy of Misery); and The General Idea of the Revolution in the Nineteenth Century.

The Bottom Billion: Why the Poorest Countries are Failing

The Bottom Billion: Why the Poorest Countries are Failing

The Bottom Billion: Why the Poorest Countries are Failing and What Can Be Done About It by Paul Collier
2008 | EPUB | 2.04MB

In the universally acclaimed and award-winning The Bottom Billion, Paul Collier reveals that fifty failed states--home to the poorest one billion people on Earth--pose the central challenge of the developing world in the twenty-first century.

The book shines much-needed light on this group of small nations, largely unnoticed by the industrialized West, that are dropping further and further behind the majority of the world's people, often falling into an absolute decline in living standards. A struggle rages within each of these nations between reformers and corrupt leaders--and the corrupt are winning. Collier analyzes the causes of failure, pointing to a set of traps that ensnare these countries, including civil war, a dependence on the extraction and export of natural resources, and bad governance. Standard solutions do not work, he writes; aid is often ineffective, and globalization can actually make matters worse, driving development to more stable nations. What the bottom billion need, Collier argues, is a bold new plan supported by the Group of Eight industrialized nations. If failed states are ever to be helped, the G8 will have to adopt preferential trade policies, new laws against corruption, new international charters, and even conduct carefully calibrated military interventions.

Collier has spent a lifetime working to end global poverty. In The Bottom Billion, he offers real hope for solving one of the great humanitarian crises facing the world today.

Identity Economics

Identity Economics

Identity Economics: How Our Identities Shape Our Work, Wages, and Well-Being by George A Akerlof, Rachel E Kranton
2011 | EPUB | 265.71KB

Identity Economics provides an important and compelling new way to understand human behavior, revealing how our identities--and not just economic incentives--influence our decisions. In 1995, economist Rachel Kranton wrote future Nobel Prize-winner George Akerlof a letter insisting that his most recent paper was wrong. Identity, she argued, was the missing element that would help to explain why people--facing the same economic circumstances--would make different choices. This was the beginning of a fourteen-year collaboration--and of Identity Economics.

The authors explain how our conception of who we are and who we want to be may shape our economic lives more than any other factor, affecting how hard we work, and how we learn, spend, and save. Identity economics is a new way to understand people's decisions--at work, at school, and at home. With it, we can better appreciate why incentives like stock options work or don't; why some schools succeed and others don't; why some cities and towns don't invest in their futures--and much, much more.

Identity Economics bridges a critical gap in the social sciences. It brings identity and norms to economics. People's notions of what is proper, and what is forbidden, and for whom, are fundamental to how hard they work, and how they learn, spend, and save. Thus people's identity--their conception of who they are, and of who they choose to be--may be the most important factor affecting their economic lives. And the limits placed by society on people's identity can also be crucial determinants of their economic well-being.

pages: 395 396 397 398 399 400 401 402 403 404 405
*100: 100 200 300 400