Secrets of the World's Best-Selling Writer: The Storytelling Techniques of Erle Stanley Gardner [EPUB]

Secrets of the World's Best-Selling Writer: The Storytelling Techniques of Erle Stanley Gardner [EPUB]
Secrets of the World's Best-Selling Writer: The Storytelling Techniques of Erle Stanley Gardner by Francis L Fugate, Roberta B Fugate
2015 | EPUB | 3.05MB

All the hard-earned storytelling skills of Erle Stanley Gardner, creator of Perry Mason and one of the best-selling writers of all time, are revealed in this informative, entertaining, and instructive book. The authors clearly present and analyze all the elements of narrative character, plot, conflict, and resolution as Gardner used them. Numerous extraordinary charts, diagrams, and outlines makes his hard-earned technical skills available to the reader in practical and useful forms.

This book is ideal for Gardner collectors and fans, and equally for students of writing at all levels would-be writers, neophytes, and even published authors for it offers one of the most practical and professional courses ever in storytelling technique.

The Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue: A Dictionary of Buckish Slang, University Wit, and Pickpocket Eloquence [EPUB]

The Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue: A Dictionary of Buckish Slang, University Wit, and Pickpocket Eloquence [EPUB]
The Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue: A Dictionary of Buckish Slang, University Wit, and Pickpocket Eloquence by Francis Grose
2014 | EPUB | 0.3MB

Do you know your abbess from your elbowshaker? Originally printed as a guide to street slang for men of quality, this reference guide will enrich your vocabulary with vulgar witticisms fashionable more than 200 years ago.

The avowed purpose of this dictionary was to give men "of fashion" an insight into the inappropriate language of the street. Read in modern times it is by turn uproariously funny and deeply confusing and yet certain truths have remained—the need for the mot juste has not diminished. Many of the words should be brought back into common parlance forthwith: we have no term for the "admiral of the narrow seas," one who from drunkenness vomits into the lap of the person sitting opposite to him. We have perhaps less use for a word for "dobin rig" or "Stealing ribbons from haberdashers early in the morning or late at night; generally practised by women in the disguise of maid servants." Learn how the Georgians and early Victorians would insult each other and find out how some of today's words and derivations have come about in this quirky little volume.

Tokyo Vernacular: Common Spaces, Local Histories, Found Objects [EPUB]

Tokyo Vernacular: Common Spaces, Local Histories, Found Objects [EPUB]
Tokyo Vernacular: Common Spaces, Local Histories, Found Objects by Jordan Sand
2013 | EPUB | 12.99MB

Preserved buildings and historic districts, museums and reconstructions have become an important part of the landscape of cities around the world. Beginning in the 1970s, Tokyo participated in this trend. However, repeated destruction and rapid redevelopment left the city with little building stock of recognized historical value. Late twentieth-century Tokyo thus presents an illuminating case of the emergence of a new sense of history in the city’s physical environment, since it required both a shift in perceptions of value and a search for history in the margins and interstices of a rapidly modernizing cityscape. Scholarship to date has tended to view historicism in the postindustrial context as either a genuine response to loss, or as a cynical commodification of the past.

The historical process of Tokyo’s historicization suggests other interpretations. Moving from the politics of the public square to the invention of neighborhood community, to oddities found and appropriated in the streets, to the consecration of everyday scenes and artifacts as heritage in museums, Tokyo Vernacular traces the rediscovery of the past—sometimes in unlikely forms—in a city with few traditional landmarks. Tokyo's rediscovered past was mobilized as part of a new politics of the everyday after the failure of mass politics in the 1960s. Rather than conceiving the city as national center and claiming public space as national citizens, the post-1960s generation came to value the local places and things that embodied the vernacular language of the city, and to seek what could be claimed as common property outside the spaces of corporate capitalism and the state.

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