A Guide to Reading and Writing Japanese, 4th Edition [PDF]

A Guide to Reading and Writing Japanese, 4th Edition [PDF]
A Guide to Reading and Writing Japanese, Fourth Edition by Florence Sakade, Janet Ikeda
2013 | PDF | 12.25MB

This is an essential study tool for students seeking to learn Japanese and dramatically improve their ability to read and write kanji and kana.

Students have been reading and writing the Japanese language for centuries, and they build their knowledge most successfully when they rely on a trusted resource. Today's most trusted—and readily available—resource is A Guide to Reading and Writing Japanese. This classic, best-selling learning and reference work, trusted by beginning and intermediate students of Japanese is the best way to learn kanji and kana, and is now being offered as a fourth, thoroughly revised and up-to-date edition.

Having a knowledge of the full set of General Use characters is the key to mastering everyday Japanese and will allow students to read and write Japanese up to the level of a typical Japanese newspaper with ease and confidence.

Key features on this revised edition include:

  • The most recent changes prescribed by the Japanese Ministry of Education.
  • Covers all the 2,136 characters in the 'General Use' / Joyo Kanji set.
  • Special codes indicate the kanji required for the JLPT and AP exams.
  • Full range of Japanese character readings and English definitions
  • Stroke counts, sroke–order diagrams, and compounds.
  • Essential Japanese characters are presented according to the new arrangement by grade, based on their frequency of usage rather than their complexity.
  • Numerous examples are given of the kanji compounds and derivatives used to form everyday words in Japanese.

The Book of Lost Books [EPUB]

The Book of Lost Books [EPUB]
The Book of Lost Books: An Incomplete History of All the Great Books You'll Never Read by Stuart Kelly
2006 | EPUB | 2.0MB

In an age when deleted scenes from Adam Sandler movies are saved, it’s sobering to realize that some of the world’s greatest prose and poetry has gone missing. This witty, wry, and unique new book rectifies that wrong. Part detective story, part history lesson, part exposé, The Book of Lost Books is the first guide to literature’s what-ifs and never-weres.

In compulsively readable fashion, Stuart Kelly reveals details about tantalizing vanished works by the famous, the acclaimed, and the influential, from the time of cave drawings to the late twentieth century. Here are the true stories behind stories, poems, and plays that now exist only in imagination:

  • Aristophanes’ Heracles, the Stage Manager was one of the playwright’s several spoofs that disappeared.
  • Love’s Labours Won may have been a sequel to Shakespeare’s Love’s Labours Lost–or was it just an alternative title for The Taming of the Shrew?
  • Jane Austen’s incomplete novel Sanditon, was a critique of hypochondriacs and cures started when the author was fatally ill.
  • Nikolai Gogol burned the second half of Dead Souls after a religious conversion convinced him that literature was paganism.
  • Some of the thousand pages of William Burroughs’s original Naked Lunch were stolen and sold on the street by Algerian street boys.
  • Sylvia Plath’s widower, Ted Hughes, claimed that the 130 pages of her second novel, perhaps based on their marriage, were lost after her death.

Whether destroyed (Socrates’ versions of Aesop’s Fables), misplaced (Malcolm Lowry’s Ultramarine was pinched from his publisher’s car), interrupted by the author’s death (Robert Louis Stevenson’s Weir of Hermiston), or simply never begun (Vladimir Nabokov’s Speak, America, a second volume of his memoirs), these missing links create a history of literature for a parallel world. Civilized and satirical, erudite yet accessible, The Book of Lost Books is itself a find.

The Magical Chorus [EPUB]

The Magical Chorus [EPUB]
The Magical Chorus: A History of Russian Culture from Tolstoy to Solzhenitsyn by Solomon Volkov
2008 | EPUB + MOBI | 0.8/2.18MB

From the reign of Tsar Nicholas II to the brutal cult of Stalin to the ebullient, uncertain days of perestroika, nowhere has the inextricable relationship between politics and culture been more starkly illustrated than in twentieth-century Russia. In the first book to fully examine the intricate and often deadly interconnection between Russian rulers and Russian artists, cultural historian Solomon Volkov (who experienced firsthand many of the events he describes) brings to life the human stories behind some of the greatest masterpieces of our time.

Here is Tolstoy, who used his godlike place among the Russian people to rail against the autocracy, even as he eschewed violence; Gorky, the first native writer to openly welcome the revolution and who would go on to become Stalin’s closest cultural advisor; Solzhenitsyn, who famously brought the horrors of the Soviet regime to light. Here. too, are Nabokov, Pasternak, Mayakovsky, Akhmatova. In each case, Volkov analyzes the alternate determination and despair, hope and terror borne by writers in a country where, in Solzhenitsyn’s maxim, “a great writer is like a second government.”

This is also the story of the nation’s leading lights in painting, music, dance, theater, and cinema—Kandinsky and Malevich, Rachmaninoff and Stravinsky, Diaghilev and Nijinsky, Stanislavsky and Meyerhold, and Eisenstein and Tarkovsky—and the ways in which their triumphs influenced, and were influenced by, the leadership of the time.

With an insider’s insight, Volkov describes what it was like to work under constant threat of arrest, exile, or execution. He reminds us of the many artists who were compelled to live as émigrés, and explores not only their complicated relationships with their adopted countries but Russia’s love-hate relationship with Western culture as a whole—a relationship that has grown increasingly charged in the wake of the Soviet Union’s collapse.

Epic in scope and intimate in detail, The Magical Chorus is the definitive account of a remarkable era in Russia’s complex cultural life.

pages: 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115
*100: 100 200