Julie Taboulie's Lebanese Kitchen: Authentic Recipes for Fresh and Flavorful Mediterranean Home Cooking [EPUB]

Julie Taboulie's Lebanese Kitchen: Authentic Recipes for Fresh and Flavorful Mediterranean Home Cooking [EPUB]
Julie Taboulie's Lebanese Kitchen: Authentic Recipes for Fresh and Flavorful Mediterranean Home Cooking by Julie Ann Sageer (Author), Leah Bhabha
2017 | EPUB | 232.97MB

Since she was six years old, Julie Ann Sageer (nicknamed Julie Taboulie by her close-knit family) has had a passion for cooking the meals of her Lebanese heritage. Just like in her Emmy-nominated cooking show Cooking with Julie Taboulie, each of her recipes comes with hands-on instructions, tips, and tricks for making homemade Middle Eastern dishes using heaps of fresh, seasonal ingredients. Here you’ll find dishes that range from classics like falafel, shawarma, and (of course) taboulie, to warming Bazilla―a stew of tomato, green pea, and lamb―to honey and rosewater-infused desserts.

In these 125 recipes, you’ll learn how easy it is to make such Lebanese staples as fresh labneh (strained yogurt) and how to put together your own delicious, multi-purpose spice mixes. In addition to the delicious meat and chicken dishes, Lebanese cuisine offers a wide variety of vegetarian, pescatarian, vegan, and gluten-free dishes, usually with no substitutions whatsoever! Every chapter includes a multitude of dishes for eaters of all kinds and preferences, from meat-lovers to veggie-heads and everything in between.

Citrus: 150 Recipes Celebrating the Sweet and the Sour [EPUB]

Citrus: 150 Recipes Celebrating the Sweet and the Sour [EPUB]
Citrus: 150 Recipes Celebrating the Sweet and the Sour by Catherine Phipps
2017 | EPUB | 13.32MB

Citrus fruits are the most exiciting family of ingredients with which to cook. They satisfy almost every part of the palate - sweet, sour, bitter, and umami-enhancing, how many other foods are as versatile and transformative?

From the smallest squeeze of lemon, to the zing of lime zest, citrus fruits are almost magical. No longer seen as exotic, they are truly international. take the humble lime: cornerstone of the American key lime pie, fragrant in Thai curries, fresh in Mexican guacamole, used to cook raw fish in South American ceviche, pickled in India, and dried in the Middle East.

Citrus offers 150 inspiring recipes that celebrate these wonderful fruits. Through fresh salads, soups, seafood, Asian and Mediterranean-influenced meat dishes, preserves and pickles, to the world of sweet pies, cakes, and cocktails, Catherine Phipps explores the myriad uses of oranges and lemons, and all things in between. Her recipes are straightforward, easy to follow, and work perfectly every time. Citrus is a vibrant, colorful source of delight and inspiration.

The Pecan: A History of America's Native Nut [EPUB]

The Pecan: A History of America's Native Nut [EPUB]
The Pecan: A History of America's Native Nut by James McWilliams
2013 | EPUB | 3.85MB

What would Thanksgiving be without pecan pie? New Orleans without pecan pralines? Southern cooks would have to hang up their aprons without America’s native nut, whose popularity has spread far beyond the tree’s natural home. But as familiar as the pecan is, most people don’t know the fascinating story of how native pecan trees fed Americans for thousands of years until the nut was “improved” a little more than a century ago—and why that rapid domestication actually threatens the pecan’s long-term future.

In The Pecan, acclaimed writer and historian James McWilliams explores the history of America’s most important commercial nut. He describes how essential the pecan was for Native Americans—by some calculations, an average pecan harvest had the food value of nearly 150,000 bison. McWilliams explains that, because of its natural edibility, abundance, and ease of harvesting, the pecan was left in its natural state longer than any other commercial fruit or nut crop in America. Yet once the process of “improvement” began, it took less than a century for the pecan to be almost totally domesticated. Today, more than 300 million pounds of pecans are produced every year in the United States—and as much as half of that total might be exported to China, which has fallen in love with America’s native nut. McWilliams also warns that, as ubiquitous as the pecan has become, it is vulnerable to a “perfect storm” of economic threats and ecological disasters that could wipe it out within a generation. This lively history suggests why the pecan deserves to be recognized as a true American heirloom.

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