The Origins of Everything in 100 Pages (More or Less) [Audiobook]

The Origins of Everything in 100 Pages (More or Less) [Audiobook]
The Origins of Everything in 100 Pages (More or Less) [Audiobook] by David Bercovici, read by Jim Meskimen
2016 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 5 hrs 13 mins | 133.44MB

Covering 13.8 billion years, a calculatedly concise, wryly intelligent history of everything, from the Big Bang to the advent of human civilization.

With wonder, wit, and flair - and in record time and space - geophysicist David Bercovici explains how everything came to be everywhere, from the creation of stars and galaxies to the formation of Earth's atmosphere and oceans to the origin of life and human civilization. Bercovici marries humor and legitimate scientific intrigue, rocketing listeners across nearly 14 billion years and making connections between the essential theories that give us our current understanding of topics as varied as particle physics, plate tectonics, and photosynthesis. Bercovici's unique literary endeavor is a treasure trove of real, compelling science and fascinating history, providing both science lovers and complete neophytes with an unforgettable introduction to the fields of cosmology, geology, climate science, human evolution, and more.

The History of Rock & Roll: Volume 1: 1920-1963 [Audiobook]

The History of Rock & Roll: Volume 1: 1920-1963 [Audiobook]
The History of Rock & Roll: Volume 1: 1920-1963 [Audiobook] by Ed Ward, read by David Colacci
2016 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 15 hrs 32 mins | 427.15MB

Ed Ward covers the first half of the history of rock & roll in this sweeping and definitive narrative - from the 1920s, when the music of rambling medicine shows mingled with the songs of vaudeville and minstrel acts to create the very early sounds of country and rhythm and blues, to the rise of the first independent record labels post-World War II, and concluding in December 1963, just as an immense change in the airwaves took hold and the Beatles prepared for their first American tour.

In this first volume of a two-part series, Ward shares his endless depth of knowledge and through engrossing storytelling hops seamlessly from Memphis to Chicago, Detroit, England, New York, and everywhere in between. He covers the trajectories of the big name acts like Elvis Presley, Buddy Holly, Chuck Berry, and Ray Charles, while also filling in gaps of knowledge and celebrating forgotten heroes such as the Burnette brothers, the "5" Royales, and Marion Keisker, Sam Phillips's assistant, who played an integral part in launching Elvis's career.

The Good Girls Revolt: How the Women of Newsweek Sued their Bosses and Changed the Workplace [Audiobook]

The Good Girls Revolt: How the Women of Newsweek Sued their Bosses and Changed the Workplace [Audiobook]
The Good Girls Revolt: How the Women of Newsweek Sued their Bosses and Changed the Workplace [Audiobook] by Lynn Povich, read by Susan Larkin
2014 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 7 hrs 43 mins | 212.36MB

The inspiration behind the Amazon original series

It was the 1960s - a time of economic boom and social strife. Young women poured into the workplace, but the "Help Wanted" ads were segregated by gender and the "Mad Men" office culture was rife with sexual stereotyping and discrimination. Lynn Povich was one of the lucky ones, landing a job at Newsweek, renowned for its cutting-edge coverage of civil rights and the "Swinging Sixties." Nora Ephron, Jane Bryant Quinn, Ellen Goodman, and Susan Brownmiller all started there as well. It was a top-notch job - for a girl - at an exciting place. But it was a dead end.

Women researchers sometimes became reporters, rarely writers, and never editors. Any aspiring female journalist was told, "If you want to be a writer, go somewhere else." On March 16, 1970, the day Newsweek published a cover story on the fledgling feminist movement entitled "Women in Revolt," forty-six Newsweek women charged the magazine with discrimination in hiring and promotion. It was the first female class action lawsuit - the first by women journalists - and it inspired other women in the media to quickly follow suit. Lynn Povich was one of the ringleaders.

In The Good Girls Revolt, she evocatively tells the story of this dramatic turning point through the lives of several participants. With warmth, humor, and perspective, she shows how personal experiences and cultural shifts led a group of well-mannered, largely apolitical women, raised in the 1940s and 1950s, to challenge their bosses - and what happened after they did. For many, filing the suit was a radicalizing act that empowered them to "find themselves" and fight back. Others lost their way amid opportunities, pressures, discouragements, and hostilities they weren't prepared to navigate. The Good Girls Revolt also explores why changes in the law didn't solve everything. Through the lives of young female journalists at Newsweek today, Lynn Povich shows what has - and hasn't - changed in the workplace.

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