The Age of Wonder [Audiobook]

The Age of Wonder [Audiobook]
The Age of Wonder: How the Romantic Generation Discovered the Beauty and Terror of Science [Audiobook] by Richard Holmes, read by Gildart Jackson
2011 | MP3@128 kbps + EPUB | 21 hrs 30 mins | 1.18GB

National Book Critics Circle Award, Nonfiction, 2010

The Age of Wonder is a colorful and utterly absorbing history of the men and women whose discoveries and inventions at the end of the eighteenth century gave birth to the Romantic Age of Science.

When young Joseph Banks stepped onto a Tahitian beach in 1769, he hoped to discover Paradise. Inspired by the scientific ferment sweeping through Britain, the botanist had sailed with Captain Cook in search of new worlds. Other voyages of discovery-astronomical, chemical, poetical, philosophical-swiftly follow in Richard Holmes's thrilling evocation of the second scientific revolution. Through the lives of William Herschel and his sister Caroline, who forever changed the public conception of the solar system; of Humphry Davy, whose near-suicidal gas experiments revolutionized chemistry; and of the great Romantic writers, from Mary Shelley to Coleridge and Keats, who were inspired by the scientific breakthroughs of their day, Holmes brings to life the era in which we first realized both the awe-inspiring and the frightening possibilities of science-an era whose consequences are with us still.

Jerusalem's Traitor: Josephus, Masada, and the Fall of Judea [Audiobook]

Jerusalem's Traitor: Josephus, Masada, and the Fall of Judea [Audiobook]
Jerusalem's Traitor: Josephus, Masada, and the Fall of Judea [Audiobook] by Desmond Seward, read by Stephen Hoye
2014 | M4B@64 kbps + EPUB | 11 hrs 55 mins | 334.95MB

When the Jews revolted against Rome in 66 CE, Josephus, a Jerusalem aristocrat, was made a general in his nation’s army. Captured by the Romans, he saved his skin by finding favor with the emperor Vespasian. He then served as an adviser to the Roman legions, running a network of spies inside Jerusalem, in the belief that the Jews’ only hope of survival lay in surrender to Rome.

As a Jewish eyewitness who was given access to Vespasian’s campaign notebooks, Josephus is our only source of information for the war of extermination that ended in the destruction of Jerusalem and its Temple, and the amazing times in which he lived. He is of vital importance for anyone interested in the Middle East, Jewish history, and the early history of Christianity.

The Birth of Classical Europe: A History from Troy to Augustine [Audiobook]

The Birth of Classical Europe: A History from Troy to Augustine [Audiobook]
The Birth of Classical Europe: A History from Troy to Augustine [Audiobook] by Simon Price, Peter Thonemann, read by Don Hagen
2011 | MP3 VBR V0 + EPUB + MOBI | 14 hrs 47 mins | 862.89MB

To an extraordinary extent we continue to live in the shadow of the classical world. At every level, from languages to calendars to political systems, we are the descendants of a "classical Europe," using frames of reference created by ancient Mediterranean cultures. As this consistently fresh and surprising new audio book makes clear, however, this was no less true for the inhabitants of those classical civilizations themselves, whose myths, history, and buildings were an elaborate engagement with an already old and revered past - one filled with great leaders and writers, emigrations and battles. Indeed, much of the reason we know so much about the classical past is because of the obsessive importance it held for so many generations of Greeks and Romans, who interpreted and reinterpreted their changing casts of heroes and villains. Figures such as Alexander the Great and Augustus Caesar loom large in our imaginations today, but they themselves were fascinated by what had preceded them.

A stunning work of research and imagination, The Birth of Classical Europe is an authoritative history, covering two millennia of human experience and casting new light on the world that in many ways still defines our own. In their thoughtful look at the twin engines of memory and culture, Simon Price and Peter Thonemann show how our own changing values and interests have shaped our feelings about an era that is by some measures very remote but by others startlingly close.

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