Pogrom: Kishinev and the Tilt of History [Audiobook]

Pogrom: Kishinev and the Tilt of History [Audiobook]
Pogrom: Kishinev and the Tilt of History [Audiobook] by Steven J Zipperstein, read by Barry Abrams
2018 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 6 hrs 38 mins | 182.87MB

So shattering were the aftereffects of Kishinev, the rampage that broke out in late-Tsarist Russia in April 1903, that one historian remarked that it was "nothing less than a prototype for the Holocaust itself." In three days of violence, 49 Jews were killed and 600 raped or wounded, while more than 1,000 Jewish-owned houses and stores were ransacked and destroyed.

Recounted in lurid detail by newspapers throughout the Western world, and covered sensationally by America's Hearst press, the pre-Easter attacks seized the imagination of an international public, quickly becoming the prototype for what would become known as a "pogrom", and providing the impetus for efforts as varied as The Protocols of the Elders of Zion and the NAACP.

Using new evidence culled from Russia, Israel, and Europe, distinguished historian Steven J. Zipperstein's wide-ranging book brings historical insight and clarity to a much-misunderstood event that would do so much to transform 20th-century Jewish life and beyond.

Denmark Vesey's Garden: Slavery and Memory in the Cradle of the Confederacy [Audiobook]

Denmark Vesey's Garden: Slavery and Memory in the Cradle of the Confederacy [Audiobook]
Denmark Vesey's Garden: Slavery and Memory in the Cradle of the Confederacy [Audiobook] by Ethan J Kytle, Blain Roberts, read by Tom Perkins
2018 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 14 hrs 33 mins | 401.98MB

A book that strikes at the heart of the recent flare-ups over Confederate symbols in Charlottesville, New Orleans, and elsewhere, Denmark Vesey's Garden reveals the deep roots of these controversies and traces them to the heart of slavery in the United States: Charleston, South Carolina, where almost half of the US slave population stepped onto our shores, where the first shot at Fort Sumter began the Civil War, and where Dylann Roof shot nine people at Emanuel A.M.E. Church, the congregation of Denmark Vesey, a black revolutionary who plotted a massive slave insurrection in 1822.

As early as 1865, former slaveholders and their descendants began working to preserve a romanticized memory of the antebellum South. In contrast, former slaves, their descendants, and some white allies have worked to preserve an honest, unvarnished account of slavery as the cruel system it was.

Examining public rituals, controversial monuments, and whitewashed historical tourism, Denmark Vesey's Garden tracks these two rival memories from the Civil War all the way to contemporary times, where two segregated tourism industries still reflect these opposing impressions of the past, exposing a hidden dimension of America's deep racial divide.

The First Day of the Blitz: September 7, 1940 [Audiobook]

The First Day of the Blitz: September 7, 1940 [Audiobook]
The First Day of the Blitz: September 7, 1940 [Audiobook] by Peter Stansky, read by Edwin David
2018 | MP3@64 kbps | 5 hrs 35 mins | 154.68MB

On September 7, 1940, the long-feared and anticipated attack by the German Luftwaffe plunged London into a cauldron of fire and devastation. This compelling audiobook recreates that day in all its horror, using rich archival sources and first-hand accounts, many never before published. Eminent historian Peter Stansky weaves together the stories of people who recorded their experiences of the opening hours of the Blitz. Then, exploring more deeply, the author examines what that critical day meant to the nation at the time, and what it came to mean in following years.

Much of the future of Britain was determined in the first twelve hours of bombing, Stansky contends. The Blitz set in motion a range of responses that contributed to ultimate victory over Germany and to a transformation of British society. The wave of terror, though designed to quash morale, instead inspired stoicism, courage, and a new camaraderie. The tragic London bombing can reveal much of relevance to our own violent times, Stansky concludes: both the effectiveness of modern terror and its ultimate failure are made powerfully clear by the events of September 7, 1940.

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