67 Shots: Kent State and the End of American Innocence [Audiobook]

67 Shots: Kent State and the End of American Innocence [Audiobook]
67 Shots: Kent State and the End of American Innocence [Audiobook] by Howard Means, read by Alan Sklar
2016 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 9 hrs 59 mins | 274.98MB

At midday on May 4, 1970, after three days of protests, several thousand students and the Ohio National Guard faced off at opposite ends of the grassy campus commons at Kent State University. At noon, the Guard moved out. Twenty-four minutes later, Guardsmen launched a 13-second, 67-shot barrage that left four students dead and nine wounded, one paralyzed for life. The story doesn't end there, though. A horror of far greater proportions was narrowly averted minutes later when the Guard and students reassembled on the commons.

The Kent State shootings were both unavoidable and preventable: unavoidable in that all the discordant forces of a turbulent decade flowed together on May 4, 1970, on one Ohio campus; preventable in that every party to the tragedy made the wrong choices at the wrong time in the wrong place.

Using the university's recently available oral-history collection supplemented by extensive new interviewing, Means tells the story of this iconic American moment through the eyes and memories of those who were there, and skillfully situates it in the context of a tumultuous era.

The Electrifying Fall of Rainbow City: Spectacle and Assassination at the 1901 World's Fair [Audiobook]

The Electrifying Fall of Rainbow City: Spectacle and Assassination at the 1901 World's Fair [Audiobook]
The Electrifying Fall of Rainbow City: Spectacle and Assassination at the 1901 World's Fair [Audiobook] by Margaret Creighton, read by Callie Beaulieu
2016 | MP3@32 kbps + EPUB | 9 hrs 22 mins | 128.23MB

In 1901, Buffalo, New York, the eighth biggest city in America, wanted to launch the new century with the Pan American Exposition. It would showcase the Western hemisphere and bring millions of people to Western New York. With Niagara Falls as a drawing card, and with stunning colors and electric lights, promoters believed it would be bigger, better, and - literally - more brilliant than Chicago's White City of 1893.

Weaving together narratives of both notorious and forgotten figures, Margaret Creighton unveils the fair's big tragedy and its lesser-known scandals. From a deranged laborer who stalked and shot President William McKinley to a 60-year-old woman who rode a barrel over Niagara Falls to two astonishing acts - a little person and an elephant - who turned the tables on their duplicitous manager, Creighton reveals the myriad power struggles that would personify modern America. The Buffalo fair announced the new century, but in ways nobody expected.

D DAY Through German Eyes: The Hidden Story of June 6th 1944 [Audiobook]

D DAY Through German Eyes: The Hidden Story of June 6th 1944 [Audiobook]
D DAY Through German Eyes: The Hidden Story of June 6th 1944 [Audiobook] by Holger Eckhertz, read by P J Ochlan
2016 | MP3@64 kbps + AZW3 | 6 hrs 7 mins | 167.03MB

This is the hidden side of D-Day which has fascinated readers/listeners around the world.

Almost all accounts of D-Day are told from the Allied perspective, with the emphasis on how German resistance was overcome on June 6, 1944. But what was it like to be a German soldier in the bunkers and gun emplacements of the Normandy coast, facing the onslaught of the mightiest seaborne invasion in history? What motivated the German defenders, what were their thought processes - and how did they fight from one strong point to another, among the dunes and fields, on that first cataclysmic day? What were their experiences on facing the tanks, the flamethrowers and the devastating air superiority of the Allies?

This book sheds fascinating light on these questions, bringing together statements made by German survivors after the war, when time had allowed them to reflect on their state of mind, their actions and their choices of June 6. We see a perspective of D-Day which deserves to be added to the historical record, in which ordinary German troops struggled to make sense of the onslaught that was facing them, and emerged stunned at the weaponry and sheer determination of the Allied soldiers. We see, too, how the Germans fought in the great coastal bunkers, perceived as impregnable fortresses, but in reality often becoming tombs for their crews. Above all, we now have the unheard human voices of the individual German soldiers - the men who are so often portrayed as a faceless mass.

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