The Gulag Archipelago, Volume l: The Prison Industry and Perpetual Motion [Audiobook]

The Gulag Archipelago, Volume l: The Prison Industry and Perpetual Motion [Audiobook]
The Gulag Archipelago, Volume l: The Prison Industry and Perpetual Motion [Audiobook] by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, read by Frederick Davidson
2011 | M4B@64 kbps | 26 hrs 1 min | 730.01MB

In this masterpiece, Solzhenitsyn has orchestrated thousands of incidents and individual histories into one narrative of unflagging power and momentum. Written in a tone that encompasses Olympian wrath, bitter calm, savage irony, and sheer comedy, it combines history, autobiography, documentary, and political analysis as it examines in its totality the Soviet apparatus of repression from its inception following the October Revolution of 1917.

This volume involves us in the innocent victim's arrest and preliminary detention and the stages by which he is transferred across the breadth of the Soviet Union to his ultimate destination: the hard-labor camp.

The Gulag Archipelago, Volume II: The Destructive-Labor Camps and The Soul and Barbed Wire [Audiobook]

The Gulag Archipelago, Volume II: The Destructive-Labor Camps and The Soul and Barbed Wire [Audiobook]
The Gulag Archipelago, Volume II: The Destructive-Labor Camps and The Soul and Barbed Wire [Audiobook] by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, read by Frederick Davidson
2011 | M4B@64 kbps | 27 hrs 35 mins | 776.02MB

This second volume in Solzhenitsyn’s narrative chronicles the appalling inhumanity of the Soviets' "Destructive-Labor Camps" and the fate of prisoners in them—felling timber, building canals and railroads, and mining gold without equipment or adequate food or clothing, and subject always to the caprices of the camp authorities. Most tragic of all is the life of the women prisoners and the luckless children they bear.

Once again, this chronicle of appalling inhumanity is made endurable by the vitality and emotional range of the writing. In one truly remarkable chapter, a parody of an anthropological treatise, Solzhenitsyn achieves new heights of sardonic wit. And in the final section, the music changes and he provides a magnificent coda on the possibilities of redemption and purification through suffering.

The Gulag Archipelago: Volume III: Katorga, Exile, Stalin Is No More [Audiobook]

The Gulag Archipelago: Volume III: Katorga, Exile, Stalin Is No More [Audiobook]
The Gulag Archipelago: Volume III: Katorga, Exile, Stalin Is No More [Audiobook] by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, read by Frederick Davidson
2000 | M4B@64 kbps | 22 hours | 617.2MB

In this final volume of a towering work that is both literary masterpiece and living memorial to the untold millions of Soviet martyrs, Solzhenitsyn's epic narrative moves to its astounding and unforseen climax. We now see that this great cathedral of a book not only commemorates those massed victims but celebrates the unquenched spirit of resistance that flickered and then burst into flame even in Stalin's "special camps."

Of the Archipelago as a whole, Le Monde has said: "It is the epic of our times. An epic is always the creation of an entire people, written by the one person who has the creative power and the genius to become the spokesman for his nation. And in this work, we hear a people speaking through the impassioned, intrepid, ironic, furious, lyrical, brutal, and often tender voice of the narrator."

pages: 075 076 077 078 079 080 081 082 083 084 085
*100: 100 200