Brethren by Nature: New England Indians, Colonists, and the Origins of American Slavery [Audiobook]

Brethren by Nature: New England Indians, Colonists, and the Origins of American Slavery [Audiobook]
Brethren by Nature: New England Indians, Colonists, and the Origins of American Slavery [Audiobook] by Margaret Ellen Newell, read by Aaron Killian
2016 | MP3@64 kbps | 12 hrs 59 mins | 357.12MB

In Brethren by Nature, Margaret Ellen Newell reveals a little-known aspect of American history: English colonists in New England enslaved thousands of Indians. Massachusetts became the first English colony to legalize slavery in 1641, and the colonists' desire for slaves shaped the major New England Indian wars, including the Pequot War of 1637, King Philip's War of 1675-76, and the northeastern Wabanaki conflicts of 1676-1749.

Newell also explains how slavery linked the fate of Africans and Indians. The trade in Indian captives connected New England to Caribbean and Atlantic slave economies. Indians labored on sugar plantations in Jamaica, tended fields in the Azores, and rowed English naval galleys in Tangier. Indian slaves outnumbered Africans within New England before 1700, but the balance soon shifted. Fearful of the growing African population, local governments stripped Indian and African servants and slaves of legal rights and personal freedoms.

The Memory Code [Audiobook]

The Memory Code [Audiobook]
The Memory Code: The Traditional Aboriginal Memory Technique That Unlocks the Secrets of Stonehenge, Easter Island and Ancient Monuments the World Over [Audiobook] by Lynne Kelly, read by Louise Siverson
2016 | M4B@64 kbps + EPUB | 11 hrs 22 mins | 307.27MB

The discovery of a powerful memory technique used by our Neolithic ancestors in their monumental memory places―and how we can use their secrets to train our own minds

In ancient, pre-literate cultures across the globe, tribal elders had encyclopedic memories. They could name all the animals and plants across a landscape, identify the stars in the sky, and recite the history of their people. Yet today, most of us struggle to memorize more than a short poem.

Using traditional Aboriginal Australian songlines as the key, Lynne Kelly has identified the powerful memory technique used by indigenous people around the world. She has discovered that this ancient memory technique is the secret behind the great stone monuments like Stonehenge, which have for so long puzzled archaeologists.

The stone circles across Britain and Northern Europe, the elaborate stone houses of New Mexico, huge animal shapes in Peru, and the statues of Easter Island all serve as the most effective memory system ever invented by humans. They allowed people in nonliterate cultures to memorise the vast amounts of practical information they needed to survive.

In her fascinating audiobook, The Memory Code, Lynne Kelly shows us how we can use this ancient technique to train our memories today.

The Untold Story of the Talking Book [Audiobook]

The Untold Story of the Talking Book [Audiobook]
The Untold Story of the Talking Book [Audiobook] by Matthew Rubery, read by Jim Denison
2016 | M4B@64 kbps | 11 hrs 31 mins | 315.63MB

This is the first scholarly book to examine the significance of recorded literature from Thomas Edison's invention of the phonograph in 1877 to the present.

Histories of the book often move straight from the codex to the digital screen. Left out of that familiar account is nearly 150 years of audio recordings. Recounting the fascinating history of audio-recorded literature, Matthew Rubery traces the path of innovation from Edison's recitation of "Mary Had a Little Lamb" for his tinfoil phonograph in 1877 to the first novel-length talking books made for blinded World War I veterans to today's billion-dollar audiobook industry.

The Untold Story of the Talking Book focuses on the social impact of audiobooks, not just the technological history, in telling a story of surprising and impassioned conflicts: from controversies over which books the Library of Congress selected to become talking books - yes to Kipling, no to Flaubert - to debates about what defines a reader. Delving into the vexed relationship between spoken and printed texts, Rubery argues that storytelling can be just as engaging with the ears as with the eyes and that audiobooks deserve to be taken seriously. They are not mere derivatives of printed books but their own form of entertainment.

We have come a long way from the era of sound recorded on wax cylinders, when people imagined one day hearing entire novels on mini phonographs tucked inside their hats. Rubery tells the untold story of this incredible evolution and, in doing so, breaks from convention by treating audiobooks as a distinctively modern art form that has profoundly influenced the way we read.

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