The Third Reich Is Listening: Inside German Codebreaking 1939-45 [Audiobook]

The Third Reich Is Listening: Inside German Codebreaking 1939-45 [Audiobook]
The Third Reich Is Listening: Inside German Codebreaking 1939-45 [Audiobook] by Christian Jennings, read by Simon Shepherd
2018 | M4B@64 kbps | 13 hours and 12 minutes | 359.73MB

The codebreakers at Bletchley Park have been immortalised in films such as The Imitation Game and Enigma, but the Germans were also breaking Allied ciphers. The Third Reich Is Listening is the comprehensive account of the successes, failures and science of Germany's codebreaking and signals intelligence operations from 1935 to 1945.

This fast-moving blend of modern history and popular science is told through colourful personal accounts of the Germans at the heart of the story, including a former astronomer who worked out the British order of battle in 1940, a U-boat commander on the front line of the Battle of the Atlantic and the woman from the foreign ministry decrypting Japanese and Italian signals.

It investigates how and why a regime as technologically advanced as the Third Reich both succeeded and failed in its battle to break their enemy's codes and to use the resultant intelligence effectively, and why they failed to recognise the fact that the Allies had cracked the enigma code.

Hitler's American Friends: The Third Reich's Supporters in the United States [Audiobook]

Hitler's American Friends: The Third Reich's Supporters in the United States [Audiobook]
Hitler's American Friends: The Third Reich's Supporters in the United States [Audiobook] by Bradley W Hart, read by Chris Ciulla
2018 | M4B@64 kbps | 11 hours and 15 minutes | 306.73MB

Hitler's American Friends, by Bradley W. Hart, is an audiobook examining the strange terrain of Nazi sympathizers, nonintervention campaigners, and other voices in America who advocated on behalf of Nazi Germany in the years before World War II.

Americans who remember World War II reminisce about how it brought the country together. The less-popular truth behind this warm nostalgia: Until the attack on Pearl Harbor, America was deeply, dangerously divided.

Bradley W. Hart's Hitler's American Friends exposes the homegrown antagonists who sought to protect and promote Hitler, leave Europeans (and especially European Jews) to fend for themselves, and elevate the Nazi regime.

Some of these friends were Americans of German heritage who joined the Bund, whose leadership dreamed of installing a stateside Führer. Some were as bizarre and hair-raising as the Silver Shirt Legion, run by an eccentric who claimed Hitler fulfilled a religious prophesy. Some were Midwestern Catholics like Father Charles Coughlin, an early right-wing radio star who broadcast anti-Semitic tirades. They were even members of Congress who used their franking privilege - sending mail at cost to American taxpayers - to distribute German propaganda. And celebrity pilot Charles Lindbergh ended up speaking for them all at the America First Committee.

We try to tell ourselves it couldn't happen here, but Americans are not immune to the lure of fascism. Hitler's American Friends is a powerful look at how the forces of evil manipulate ordinary people, how we stepped back from the ledge, and the disturbing ease with which we could return to it.

The Rise of Yeast: How the Sugar Fungus Shaped Civilization [Audiobook]

The Rise of Yeast: How the Sugar Fungus Shaped Civilization [Audiobook]
The Rise of Yeast: How the Sugar Fungus Shaped Civilization [Audiobook] by Nicholas P Money, read by David Colacci
2018 | M4B@64 kbps | 6 hours and 16 minutes | 170.94MB

The great Victorian biologist Thomas Huxley once wrote, "I know of no familiar substance forming part of our every-day knowledge and experience, the examination of which, with a little care, tends to open up such very considerable issues as does yeast." Huxley was right. Beneath the very foundations of human civilization lies yeast-also known as the sugar fungus. Yeast is responsible for fermenting our alcohol and providing us with bread - the very staples of life. Moreover, it has proven instrumental in helping cell biologists and geneticists understand how living things work, manufacturing life-saving drugs, and producing biofuels that could help save the planet from global warming.

In The Rise of Yeast, Nicholas P. Money argues that we cannot ascribe too much importance to yeast, and that its discovery and controlled use profoundly altered human history. Humans knew what yeast did long before they knew what it was. It was not until Louis Pasteur's experiments in the 1860s that scientists even acknowledged its classification as a fungus. A compelling blend of science, history, and sociology, The Rise of Yeast explores the rich, strange, and utterly symbiotic relationship between people and yeast, a stunning account that takes us back to the roots of human history.

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