Black Fortunes: The Story of the First Six African Americans Who Escaped Slavery and Became Millionaires [Audiobook]

Black Fortunes: The Story of the First Six African Americans Who Escaped Slavery and Became Millionaires [Audiobook]
Black Fortunes: The Story of the First Six African Americans Who Escaped Slavery and Became Millionaires [Audiobook] by Shomari Wills, read by Ron Butler
2018 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 6 hrs 51 mins | 190.85MB

The astonishing untold history of America's first black millionaires - former slaves who endured incredible challenges to amass and maintain their wealth for a century, from the Jacksonian period to the Roaring '20s - self-made entrepreneurs whose unknown success mirrored that of American business heroes such as Henry Ford, John D. Rockefeller, and Thomas Edison.

While Oprah Winfrey, Jay-Z, Beyoncé, Michael Jordan, and Will Smith are among the estimated 35,000 black millionaires in the nation today, these famous celebrities were not the first blacks to reach the storied 1 percent. Between the years of 1830 and 1927, as the last generation of blacks born into slavery were reaching maturity, a small group of smart, tenacious, and daring men and women broke new ground to attain the highest levels of financial success.

Black Fortunes is an intriguing look at these remarkable individuals, including Napoleon Bonaparte Drew - author Shomari Wills' great-great-great-grandfather - the first black man in Powhatan County (contemporary Richmond) to own property in post-Civil War Virginia. His achievements were matched by five other unknown black entrepreneurs including:

  • Mary Ellen Pleasant, who used her Gold Rush wealth to further the cause of abolitionist John Brown
  • Robert Reed Church, who became the largest landowner in Tennessee
  • Hannah Elias, the mistress of a New York City millionaire, who used the land her lover gave her to build an empire in Harlem
  • Orphan and self-taught chemist Annie Turnbo-Malone, who developed the first national brand of hair care products
  • Madam C. J Walker, Turnbo-Malone's employee who would earn the nickname America's "first female black millionaire"
  • Mississippi school teacher O. W. Gurley, who developed a piece of Tulsa, Oklahoma, into a "town" for wealthy black professionals and craftsmen that would become known as "the Black Wall Street"

A fresh, little-known chapter in the nation's story - a blend of Hidden Figures, Titan, and The Tycoons - Black Fortunes illuminates the birth of the black business titan and the emergence of the black marketplace in America as never before.

A More Beautiful and Terrible History: The Uses and Misuses of Civil Rights History [Audiobook]

A More Beautiful and Terrible History: The Uses and Misuses of Civil Rights History [Audiobook]
A More Beautiful and Terrible History: The Uses and Misuses of Civil Rights History [Audiobook] by Jeanne Theoharis, read by Kim Staunton
2018 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 11 hrs 17 mins | 310.8MB

Explodes the fables that have been created about the civil rights movement

The civil rights movement has become national legend, lauded by presidents from Reagan to Obama to Trump, as proof of the power of American democracy. This fable, featuring dreamy heroes and accidental heroines, has shuttered the movement firmly in the past, whitewashed the forces that stood in its way, and diminished its scope. And it is used perniciously in our own times to chastise present-day movements and obscure contemporary injustice.

In A More Beautiful and Terrible History, award-winning historian Jeanne Theoharis dissects this national mythmaking, teasing apart the accepted stories to show them in a strikingly different light. We see Rosa Parks as not simply a bus lady but a lifelong criminal justice activist and radical; Martin Luther King Jr. as challenging not only Southern sheriffs but Northern liberals, too; and Coretta Scott King as not only a "helpmate" but a lifelong economic justice and peace activist who pushed her husband's activism in these directions.

Moving from "the histories we get" to "the histories we need", Theoharis challenges nine key aspects of the fable to reveal the diversity of people, especially women and young people, who led the movement; the work and disruption it took; the role of the media and "polite racism" in maintaining injustice; and the immense barriers and repression activists faced. Theoharis makes us reckon with the fact that far from being acceptable, passive, or unified, the civil rights movement was unpopular, disruptive, and courageously persevering. Activists embraced an expansive vision of justice - which a majority of Americans opposed and which the federal government feared.

By showing us the complex reality of the movement, the power of its organizing, and the beauty and scope of the vision, Theoharis proves that there was nothing natural or inevitable about the progress that occurred. A More Beautiful and Terrible History will change our historical frame, revealing the richness of our civil rights legacy, the uncomfortable mirror it holds to the nation, and the crucial work that remains to be done.

Kennedy and King: The President, the Pastor, and the Battle over Civil Rights [Audiobook]

Kennedy and King: The President, the Pastor, and the Battle over Civil Rights [Audiobook]
Kennedy and King: The President, the Pastor, and the Battle over Civil Rights [Audiobook] by Steven Levingston, read by Dan Woren
2017 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 19 hrs 53 mins | 547.11MB

Kennedy and King traces the emergence of two of the twentieth century's greatest leaders, their powerful impact on each other and on the shape of the civil rights battle between 1960 and 1963. These two men from starkly different worlds profoundly influenced each other's personal development. Kennedy's hesitation on civil rights spurred King to greater acts of courage, and King inspired Kennedy to finally make a moral commitment to equality. As America still grapples with the legacy of slavery and the persistence of discrimination, Kennedy and King is a vital, vivid contribution to the literature of the Civil Rights Movement.

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