Fishing: How the Sea Fed Civilization [Audiobook]

Fishing: How the Sea Fed Civilization [Audiobook]
Fishing: How the Sea Fed Civilization [Audiobook] by Brian Fagan, read by Shaun Grindell
2017 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 13 hrs 2 mins | 359.39MB

In this history of fishing - not as sport but as sustenance - archaeologist and best-selling author Brian Fagan argues that fishing was an indispensable and often overlooked element in the growth of civilization. It sustainably provided enough food to allow cities, nations, and empires to grow, but it did so with a different emphasis.

Where agriculture encouraged stability, fishing demanded movement. It frequently required a search for new and better fishing grounds; its technologies, centered on boats, facilitated movement and discovery; and fish themselves, when dried and salted, were the ideal food - lightweight, nutritious, and long-lasting - for traders, travelers, and conquering armies.

This history of the long interaction of humans and seafood tours archaeological sites worldwide to show listeners how fishing fed human settlement, rising social complexity, the development of cities, and ultimately the modern world.

Hitler's Children: Sons and Daughters of Third Reich Leaders [Audiobook]

Hitler's Children: Sons and Daughters of Third Reich Leaders [Audiobook]
Hitler's Children: Sons and Daughters of Third Reich Leaders [Audiobook] by Gerald Posner, read by Julian Elfer
2017 | MP3@64 kbps + AZW3 | 8 hrs 48 mins | 242.77MB

Göring. Hess. Mengele. Dönitz. Names that conjure up dark memories of Nazi Germany and the Holocaust. They were the architects of the Third Reich. And they were fathers. Gerald Posner convinced 11 sons and daughters of Hitler's inner circle to break their silence.

This second generation of perpetrators in Hitler's Children struggle with their Third Reich inheritance. In grappling with memories of good and loving fathers who were later charged with war crimes, these heirs to the Nazi legacy add a fresh and important perspective to understanding the complexity of what historian, Hannah Arendt, dubbed "the banality of evil".

Hitler's Children is much more, however, than a series of startling family interviews. It is also a spellbinding insider's look at some of the men whose names have become synonymous with terror. This is a classic book about the second generation of Nazi perpetrators (the only one ever to have family interviews with Hess, Mengele, Donitz, and Göring.) No other book author or documentarian ever got those children to talk again. And Norman Frank, the eldest son of war criminal Hans Frank, also never spoke to anyone but Posner.

Hitler's Generals in America: Nazi POWs and Allied Military Intelligence [Audiobook]

Hitler's Generals in America: Nazi POWs and Allied Military Intelligence [Audiobook]
Hitler's Generals in America: Nazi POWs and Allied Military Intelligence [Audiobook] by Derek R Mallett, read by Steve Rausch
2017 | MP3@64 kbps | 7 hrs 35 mins | 209.04MB

Americans are familiar with prisoner of war narratives that detail Allied soldiers' treatment at the hands of Germans in World War II: popular books and movies like The Great Escape and Stalag 17 have offered graphic and award-winning depictions of the American POW experience in Nazi camps. Less is known, however, about the Germans captured and held in captivity on U.S. soil during the war.

In Hitler's Generals in America, Derek R. Mallett examines the evolution of the relationship between American officials and the Wehrmacht general officers they held as prisoners of war in the United States between 1943 and 1946. During the early years of the war, British officers spied on the German officers in their custody, housing them in elegant estates separate from enlisted soldiers, providing them with servants and cooks, and sometimes becoming their confidants in order to obtain intelligence. The Americans, on the other hand, lacked the class awareness shared by British and German officers. They ignored their German general officer prisoners, refusing them any special treatment.

By the end of the war, however, the United States had begun to envision itself as a world power rather than one of several allies providing aid during wartime. Mallett demonstrates how a growing admiration for the German officers' prowess and military traditions, coupled with postwar anxiety about Soviet intentions, drove Washington to collaborate with many Wehrmacht general officers. Drawing on newly available sources, this intriguing book vividly demonstrates how Americans undertook the complex process of reconceptualizing Germans -- even Nazi generals -- as allies against what they perceived as their new enemy, the Soviet Union.

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