Hitler's Generals in America: Nazi POWs and Allied Military Intelligence [Audiobook]

Hitler's Generals in America: Nazi POWs and Allied Military Intelligence [Audiobook]
Hitler's Generals in America: Nazi POWs and Allied Military Intelligence [Audiobook] by Derek R Mallett, read by Steve Rausch
2017 | MP3@64 kbps | 7 hrs 35 mins | 209.04MB

Americans are familiar with prisoner of war narratives that detail Allied soldiers' treatment at the hands of Germans in World War II: popular books and movies like The Great Escape and Stalag 17 have offered graphic and award-winning depictions of the American POW experience in Nazi camps. Less is known, however, about the Germans captured and held in captivity on U.S. soil during the war.

In Hitler's Generals in America, Derek R. Mallett examines the evolution of the relationship between American officials and the Wehrmacht general officers they held as prisoners of war in the United States between 1943 and 1946. During the early years of the war, British officers spied on the German officers in their custody, housing them in elegant estates separate from enlisted soldiers, providing them with servants and cooks, and sometimes becoming their confidants in order to obtain intelligence. The Americans, on the other hand, lacked the class awareness shared by British and German officers. They ignored their German general officer prisoners, refusing them any special treatment.

By the end of the war, however, the United States had begun to envision itself as a world power rather than one of several allies providing aid during wartime. Mallett demonstrates how a growing admiration for the German officers' prowess and military traditions, coupled with postwar anxiety about Soviet intentions, drove Washington to collaborate with many Wehrmacht general officers. Drawing on newly available sources, this intriguing book vividly demonstrates how Americans undertook the complex process of reconceptualizing Germans -- even Nazi generals -- as allies against what they perceived as their new enemy, the Soviet Union.

A Pope and a President: John Paul II, Ronald Reagan, and the Extraordinary Untold Story of the 20th Century [Audiobook]

A Pope and a President: John Paul II, Ronald Reagan, and the Extraordinary Untold Story of the 20th Century [Audiobook]
A Pope and a President: John Paul II, Ronald Reagan, and the Extraordinary Untold Story of the 20th Century [Audiobook] by Paul Kengor, read by James Anderson Foster
2017 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 23 hrs 19 mins | 643.09MB

Even as historians credit Ronald Reagan and Pope John Paul II with hastening the end of the Cold War, they have failed to recognize the depth or significance of the bond that developed between the two leaders.

Acclaimed scholar and best-selling author Paul Kengor changes that. In this fascinating book, he reveals a singular bond - which included a spiritual connection between the Catholic pope and the Protestant president - that drove the two men to confront what they knew to be the great evil of the 20th century: Soviet communism.

Reagan and John Paul II almost didn't have the opportunity to forge this relationship: just six weeks apart in the spring of 1981, they took bullets from would-be assassins. But their strikingly similar near-death experiences brought them close together - to Moscow's dismay.

A Pope and a President is the product of years of research. Based on Kengor's tireless archival digging and his unique access to Reagan insiders, this book reveals captivating new details on a relationship that changed history.

The Internationalists: How a Radical Plan to Outlaw War Remade the World [Audiobook]

The Internationalists: How a Radical Plan to Outlaw War Remade the World [Audiobook]
The Internationalists: How a Radical Plan to Outlaw War Remade the World [Audiobook] by Oona A. Hathaway, Scott J Shapiro, read by Amanda Carlin
2017 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 19 hrs 54 mins | 548.16MB

A bold and provocative history of the men who fought to outlaw war and how an often overlooked treaty signed in 1928 was among the most transformative events in modern history.

On a hot summer afternoon in 1928, the leaders of the world assembled in Paris to outlaw war. Within the year, the treaty signed that day, known as the Peace Pact, had been ratified by nearly every state in the world. War, for the first time in history, had become illegal the world over. But the promise of that summer day was fleeting. Within a decade of its signing, each state that had gathered in Paris to renounce war was at war. And in the century that followed, the Peace Pact was dismissed as an act of folly and an unmistakable failure. This book argues that that understanding is inaccurate and that the Peace Pact ushered in a sustained march toward peace that lasts to this day.

The Internationalists tells the story of the Peace Pact by placing it in the long history of international law from the 17th century through the present, tracing this rich history through a fascinating and diverse array of lawyers, politicians, and intellectuals - Hugo Grotius, Nishi Amane, Salmon Levinson, James Shotwell, Sumner Welles, Carl Schmitt, Hersch Lauterpacht, and Sayyid Qutb. It tells of a centuries-long struggle of ideas over the role of war in a just world order. It details the brutal world of conflict the Peace Pact helped extinguish and the subsequent era where tariffs and sanctions take the place of tanks and gunships.

The Internationalists examines with renewed appreciation an international system that has outlawed wars of aggression and brought unprecedented stability to the world map. Accessible and gripping, this book will change the way we view the history of the 20th century - and how we must work together to protect the global order the internationalists fought to make possible.

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