September Hope: The American Side of a Bridge Too Far [Audiobook]

September Hope: The American Side of a Bridge Too Far [Audiobook]
September Hope: The American Side of a Bridge Too Far [Audiobook] by John C McManus, read by Walter Dixon
2012 | M4B@64 kbps | 14 hrs 53 mins | 395.64MB

In September Hope, acclaimed historian John C. McManus explores World War II's most ambitious invasion, an immense, daring offensive to defeat Nazi Germany before the end of 1944. Operation Market-Garden is one of the war's most famous, but least understood, battles, and McManus tells the story of the American contribution to this crucial phase of the war in Europe.

August 1944 saw the Allies achieve more significant victories than in any other month over the course of the war. Soviet armies annihilated more than 20 German divisions and pushed the hated enemy from Russia to deep inside Poland. General Eisenhower's D-Day Invasion led to the liberation of France. Encouraged by these triumphs, British, Canadian, and American armored columns plunged into Belgium, Holland, and Luxembourg. The Germans were in disarray, overwhelmed on all fronts, losing soldiers by the thousands as Allied bombers pulverized their cities. For the Third Reich it seemed the end was near. Rumors swirled that the war would soon be over and that everyone would be home for Christmas.

Then came September, and Holland.

On September 17, the largest airborne drop in military history commenced - including two entire American divisions, the 101st and the 82nd. Their mission was to secure key bridges at such places as Son, Eindhoven, Grave, and Nijmegen until British armored forces could relieve them. The armor would slash northeast, breech the Rhine and go wild on the north German plains. However, the Germans were much stronger than the Allies anticipated. In eight days of ferocious combat, they mauled the airborne, stymied the tanks and prevented the Allies from crossing the Rhine. For the first time, using never-before-seen sources and countless personal interviews, September Hope reveals the American perspective on one of the most famous and decisive battles of World War II.

The General and the Genius: Groves and Oppenheimer [Audiobook]

The General and the Genius: Groves and Oppenheimer [Audiobook]
The General and the Genius: Groves and Oppenheimer - The Unlikely Partnership That Built the Atom Bomb [Audiobook] by James Kunetka, read by Malcolm Hillgartner
2015 | M4B@64 kbps + EPUB | 14 hrs 9 mins | 379.18MB

Two ambitious men. One historic mission.

With a blinding flash in the New Mexico desert in the summer of 1945, the world was changed forever. The bomb that ushered in the atomic age was the product of one of history's most improbable partnerships. The General and the Genius reveals how two extraordinary men pulled off the greatest scientific feat of the twentieth century. Leslie Richard Groves of the Army Corps of Engineers, who had made his name by building the Pentagon in record time and under budget, was made overlord of the impossibly vast scientific enterprise known as the Manhattan Project. His mission: to beat the Nazis to the atomic bomb. So he turned to the nation's preeminent theoretical physicist, J. Robert Oppenheimer—the chain-smoking, martini-quaffing son of wealthy Jewish immigrants, whose background was riddled with communist associations—Groves's opposite in nearly every respect. In their three-year collaboration, the iron-willed general and the visionary scientist led a brilliant team in a secret mountaintop lab and built the fearsome weapons that ended the war but introduced the human race to unimaginable new terrors. And at the heart of this most momentous work of World War II is the story of two extraordinary men—the general and the genius.

Islands of the Damned: A Marine at War in the Pacific [Audiobook]

Islands of the Damned: A Marine at War in the Pacific [Audiobook]
Islands of the Damned: A Marine at War in the Pacific [Audiobook] by R V Burgin, Bill Marvel, read by Sean Runnette
2010 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 6 hrs 30 mins | 178.71MB
>This is an eyewitness - and eye-opening - account of some of the most savage and brutal fighting in the war against Japan, told from the perspective of a young Texan who volunteered for the Marine Corps to escape a life as a traveling salesman.

R. V. Burgin enlisted at the age of 20 and, with his sharp intelligence and earnest work ethic, climbed the ranks from a green private to a seasoned sergeant. Along the way, he shouldered a rifle as a member of a mortar squad. He saw friends die and enemies killed. He saw scenes he wanted to forget but never did - from enemy snipers who tied themselves to branches in the highest trees, to ambushes along narrow jungle trails, to the abandoned corpses of hara kiri victims, to the final howling banzai attacks as the Japanese embraced their inevitable defeat.

An unforgettable narrative of a young Marine in combat, Islands of the Damned brings to life the hell that was the Pacific War.

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