To Rule the Waves: How the British Navy Shaped the Modern World [Audiobook]

To Rule the Waves: How the British Navy Shaped the Modern World [Audiobook]
To Rule the Waves: How the British Navy Shaped the Modern World [Audiobook] by Arthur Herman, read by John Curless
2016 | M4B@64 kbps | 29 hrs 57 mins | 816.41MB

To Rule the Waves tells the extraordinary story of how the British Royal Navy allowed one nation to rise to a level of power unprecedented in history. From the navy's beginnings under Henry VIII to the age of computer warfare and special ops, historian Arthur Herman tells the spellbinding tale of great battles at sea, heroic sailors, violent conflict, and personal tragedy - of the way one mighty institution forged a nation, an empire, and a new world.

This P.S. edition features extra insights into the book, including author interviews, recommended reading, and more.

Miracle Cure: The Creation of Antibiotics and the Birth of Modern Medicine [Audiobook]

Miracle Cure: The Creation of Antibiotics and the Birth of Modern Medicine [Audiobook]
Miracle Cure: The Creation of Antibiotics and the Birth of Modern Medicine [Audiobook] by William Rosen, read by Rob Shapiro
2017 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 12 hrs 10 mins | 334.34MB

For fans of Microbe Hunters: the epic history of how antibiotics were born, saving millions of lives and creating a vast new industry known as Big Pharma.

As late as the 1930s, virtually no drug intended for sickness did any good; doctors could set bones, deliver babies, and offer palliative care. That all changed in less than a generation with the discovery and development of a new category of medicine known as antibiotics. By 1955 the age-old evolutionary relationship between humans and microbes had been transformed, trivializing once-deadly infections.

William Rosen captures this revolution with all its false starts, lucky surprises, and eccentric characters. He explains why, given the complex nature of bacteria - and their ability to rapidly evolve into new forms - the only way to locate and test potential antibiotic strains is by large-scale, systematic trial-and-error experimentation. Organizing that research needs large, well-funded organizations and businesses, and so our entire scientific-industrial complex, built around the pharmaceutical company, was born.

Timely, engrossing, and eye opening, Miracle Cure is a must-listen science narrative - a drama of enormous range, combining science, technology, politics, and economics to illuminate the reasons behind one of the most dramatic changes in humanity's relationship with nature since the invention of agriculture 10,000 years ago.

Victorious Century: The United Kingdom, 1800-1906 [Audiobook]

Victorious Century: The United Kingdom, 1800-1906 [Audiobook]
Victorious Century: The United Kingdom, 1800-1906 [Audiobook] by David Cannadine, read by Kris Dyer
2017 | MP3@64 kbps | 24 hrs 57 mins | 689.48MB

To live in 19th-century Britain was to experience an astonishing series of changes, of a kind for which there was simply no precedent in the human experience. There were revolutions in transport, communication and work; cities grew vast; and scientific ideas made the intellectual landscape unrecognisable. This was an exhilarating time but also a horrifying one.

In his dazzling new book, David Cannadine has created a bold, fascinating new interpretation of the British 19th century in all its energy and dynamism, darkness and vice. This was a country which saw itself at the summit of the world. And yet it was a society also convulsed by doubt, fear and introspection. Repeatedly, politicians and writers felt themselves to be staring into the abyss - and what is seen sometimes seen as an era of irritating self-belief was in practice obsessed by a sense of its own fragility, whether as a great power or as a moral force.

Victorious Century is an extraordinarily enjoyable book - its author catches the relish, humour and theatricality of the age but also the dilemmas of a kind with which we remain familiar today. It reframes a time at once strangely familiar and yet wholly unlike our own.

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