The Memory Code [Audiobook]

The Memory Code [Audiobook]
The Memory Code: The Traditional Aboriginal Memory Technique That Unlocks the Secrets of Stonehenge, Easter Island and Ancient Monuments the World Over [Audiobook] by Lynne Kelly, read by Louise Siverson
2016 | M4B@64 kbps + EPUB | 11 hrs 22 mins | 307.27MB

The discovery of a powerful memory technique used by our Neolithic ancestors in their monumental memory places―and how we can use their secrets to train our own minds

In ancient, pre-literate cultures across the globe, tribal elders had encyclopedic memories. They could name all the animals and plants across a landscape, identify the stars in the sky, and recite the history of their people. Yet today, most of us struggle to memorize more than a short poem.

Using traditional Aboriginal Australian songlines as the key, Lynne Kelly has identified the powerful memory technique used by indigenous people around the world. She has discovered that this ancient memory technique is the secret behind the great stone monuments like Stonehenge, which have for so long puzzled archaeologists.

The stone circles across Britain and Northern Europe, the elaborate stone houses of New Mexico, huge animal shapes in Peru, and the statues of Easter Island all serve as the most effective memory system ever invented by humans. They allowed people in nonliterate cultures to memorise the vast amounts of practical information they needed to survive.

In her fascinating audiobook, The Memory Code, Lynne Kelly shows us how we can use this ancient technique to train our memories today.

The Untold Story of the Talking Book [Audiobook]

The Untold Story of the Talking Book [Audiobook]
The Untold Story of the Talking Book [Audiobook] by Matthew Rubery, read by Jim Denison
2016 | M4B@64 kbps | 11 hrs 31 mins | 315.63MB

This is the first scholarly book to examine the significance of recorded literature from Thomas Edison's invention of the phonograph in 1877 to the present.

Histories of the book often move straight from the codex to the digital screen. Left out of that familiar account is nearly 150 years of audio recordings. Recounting the fascinating history of audio-recorded literature, Matthew Rubery traces the path of innovation from Edison's recitation of "Mary Had a Little Lamb" for his tinfoil phonograph in 1877 to the first novel-length talking books made for blinded World War I veterans to today's billion-dollar audiobook industry.

The Untold Story of the Talking Book focuses on the social impact of audiobooks, not just the technological history, in telling a story of surprising and impassioned conflicts: from controversies over which books the Library of Congress selected to become talking books - yes to Kipling, no to Flaubert - to debates about what defines a reader. Delving into the vexed relationship between spoken and printed texts, Rubery argues that storytelling can be just as engaging with the ears as with the eyes and that audiobooks deserve to be taken seriously. They are not mere derivatives of printed books but their own form of entertainment.

We have come a long way from the era of sound recorded on wax cylinders, when people imagined one day hearing entire novels on mini phonographs tucked inside their hats. Rubery tells the untold story of this incredible evolution and, in doing so, breaks from convention by treating audiobooks as a distinctively modern art form that has profoundly influenced the way we read.

The Vanquished: Why the First World War Failed to End [Audiobook]

The Vanquished: Why the First World War Failed to End [Audiobook]
The Vanquished: Why the First World War Failed to End [Audiobook] by Robert Gerwarth, read by Michael Page
2016 | M4B@64 kbps + EPUB | 10 hrs 49 mins | 297.2MB

In The Vanquished, a highly original and gripping work of history, Robert Gerwarth asks us to think again about the true legacy of the First World War. In large part it was not the fighting on the Western Front that proved so ruinous to Europe's future but the devastating aftermath, as countries on both sides of the original conflict were savaged by revolutions, pogroms, mass expulsions, and further major military clashes. If the war itself had in most places been a struggle mainly between state-backed soldiers, these new conflicts were predominantly perpetrated by civilians and paramilitaries and driven by a murderous sense of injustice projected onto enemies real and imaginary. In the years immediately after the armistice, millions would die across central, Eastern, and Southeastern Europe before the Soviet Union and a series of rickety and exhausted small new states would come into being. It was here, in the ruins of Europe, that extreme ideologies such as fascism would take shape.

As absorbing in its drama as it is unsettling in its analysis, The Vanquished is destined to transform our understanding of not just the First World War but the 20th century as a whole.

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