Crazy Horse and Custer: The Parallel Lives of Two American Warriors [Audiobook]

Crazy Horse and Custer: The Parallel Lives of Two American Warriors [Audiobook]
Crazy Horse and Custer: The Parallel Lives of Two American Warriors [Audiobook] by Stephen E Ambrose, read by Richard Ferrone
2016 | MP3@64 kbps | 20 hrs 33 mins | 565.07MB

A New York Times bestseller from the author of Band of Brothers: The biography of two fighters forever linked by history and the battle at Little Bighorn.

On the sparkling morning of June 25, 1876, 611 men of the United States 7th Cavalry rode toward the banks of Little Bighorn in the Montana Territory, where three thousand Indians stood waiting for battle. The lives of two great warriors would soon be forever linked throughout history: Crazy Horse, leader of the Oglala Sioux, and General George Armstrong Custer. Both were men of aggression and supreme courage. Both became leaders in their societies at very early ages. Both were stripped of power, in disgrace, and worked to earn back the respect of their people. And to both of them, the unspoiled grandeur of the Great Plains of North America was an irresistible challenge. Their parallel lives would pave the way, in a manner unknown to either, for an inevitable clash between two nations fighting for possession of the open prairie.

The Book That Changed America: How Darwin's Theory of Evolution Ignited a Nation [Audiobook]

The Book That Changed America: How Darwin's Theory of Evolution Ignited a Nation [Audiobook]
The Book That Changed America: How Darwin's Theory of Evolution Ignited a Nation [Audiobook] by Randall Fuller, read by Stefan Rudnicki
2017 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 9 hrs 40 mins | 266.32MB

The compelling story of the effect of Charles Darwin's book On the Origin of Species on a diverse group of American writers, abolitionists, and social reformers, including Henry David Thoreau and Bronson Alcott, in 1860.

In early 1860, a single copy of Charles Darwin's On the Origin of Species was read and discussed by five important American intellectuals who seized on the book's assertion of a common ancestry for all creatures as a powerful argument against slavery. The book first came into the hands of Harvard botanist Asa Gray, who would lead the fight for the theory in America. Gray passed his heavily annotated copy to the child welfare reformer Charles Loring Brace, who saw value in natural selection's premise that mankind was destined to undergo progressive improvement. Brace then introduced the book to three other friends: Franklin Sanborn, a key supporter of the abolitionist John Brown, who grasped that Darwin's depiction of constant struggle and endless competition perfectly described America in 1860, especially the ongoing conflict between pro- and antislavery forces; the philosopher Bronson Alcott, who resisted Darwin's insights as a threat to transcendental idealism; and Henry David Thoreau, who used Darwin's theory to redirect the work he would pursue till the end of his life regarding species migration and the interconnectedness of nature.

The Book That Changed America offers a fascinating narrative account of these prominent figures as they grappled over the course of that year with Darwin's dangerous hypotheses. In doing so, it provides new perspectives on America prior to the Civil War, showing how Darwin's ideas become potent ammunition in the debate over slavery and helped advance the cause of abolition by giving it scientific credibility.

The Last Battle: When US and German Soldiers Joined Forces in the Waning Hours of World War II in Europe [Audiobook]

The Last Battle: When US and German Soldiers Joined Forces in the Waning Hours of World War II in Europe [Audiobook]
The Last Battle: When US and German Soldiers Joined Forces in the Waning Hours of World War II in Europe [Audiobook] by Stephen Harding, read by Joe Barrett
2013 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 7 hrs 16 mins | 197.78MB

May 1945. Hitler is dead, and the Third Reich is little more than smoking rubble. No GI wants to be the last man killed in action against the Nazis. But for cigar-chewing, rough-talking, hard-drinking, hard-charging Captain Jack Lee and his men, there is one more mission: rescue 14 prominent French prisoners held in an SS-guarded castle high in the Austrian Alps. It's a dangerous mission, but Lee has help from a decorated German Wehrmacht officer and his men, who voluntarily join the fight.

Based on personal memoirs, author interviews, and official American, German, and French histories, The Last Battle is the nearly unbelievable story of the most improbable battle of World War II - a tale of unlikely allies, bravery, cowardice, and desperate combat between implacable enemies.

pages: 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010
*100: 100 200