Lincoln and Chief Justice Taney: Slavery, Secession and the President's War Powers [Audiobook]

Lincoln and Chief Justice Taney: Slavery, Secession and the President's War Powers [Audiobook]
Lincoln and Chief Justice Taney: Slavery, Secession and the President's War Powers [Audiobook] by James F Simon, read by Richard Allen
2006 | MP3@64 kbps | 11 hrs 26 mins | 314.8MB
The clashes between President Abraham Lincoln and Chief Justice Roger B. Taney over slavery, secession, and Lincoln's constitutional war powers went to the heart of Lincoln's presidency. Lincoln and Taney's bitter disagreements began with Taney's Dred Scott opinion in 1857, when the chief justice declared that the Constitution did not grant the black man any rights that the white man was bound to honor. Lincoln attacked the opinion as a warped judicial interpretation of the Framers' intent and accused Taney of being a member of a pro-slavery national conspiracy. In his first inaugural address, Lincoln insisted that the South had no legal right to secede. Taney, who administered the oath of office to Lincoln, believed that the South's secession was legal and in the best interests of both sections of the country. Once the war began, Lincoln broadly interpreted his constitutional powers as commander-in-chief to prosecute the war, suspending habeas corpus, censoring the press, and allowing military courts to try civilians for treason. Taney vociferously disagreed, accusing Lincoln of assuming dictatorial powers in violation of the Constitution. Lincoln ignored Taney's protests and exercised his presidential authority fearlessly, determined that he would preserve the Union. James F. Simon skillfully brings to life this compelling story of the momentous tug-of-war between the president and the chief justice during the worst crisis in the nation's history.

The Ghosts of K2: The Epic Saga of the First Ascent [Audiobook]

The Ghosts of K2: The Epic Saga of the First Ascent [Audiobook]
The Ghosts of K2: The Epic Saga of the First Ascent [Audiobook] by Mick Conefrey, read by
2015 | MP3@32 kbps + EPUB | 12 hrs 16 mins | 167.65MB

At 28,251 feet, K2 might be almost 800 feet shorter than Everest, but it's a far harder climb. It will kill you on the way up and the way down.

Mick Conefrey guides us through the early story of the legendary mountain and the extraordinary attempts that led up to its first ascent in 1954 - these are tales of riveting drama and unimaginable tragedy.

Starting with the ill-fated attempts of the drug-addicted occultist Aleister Crowley and the wealthy Italian Duke of Abruzzi, the book then focusses on the three dramatic expeditions of 1939, 1953 and 1954.

The thread joining them together is the American Charlie Houston - a brilliant but tortured expedition leader who dreamed of being the first man to make it all the way to the top.

Based on exclusive interviews with surviving team members and their families and access to diaries and letters that have been archived around the world, this is a narrative that evokes the true atmosphere of the 'Savage Mountain' and explores the complicated legacy of the first ascent.

Wrought with tension and populated by tragic heroes and eccentric dreamers, Ghosts of K2 is a masterpiece of mountaineering literature.

Chernobyl 01:23:40: The Incredible True Story of the World's Worst Nuclear Disaster [Audiobook]

Chernobyl 01:23:40: The Incredible True Story of the World's Worst Nuclear Disaster [Audiobook]
Chernobyl 01:23:40: The Incredible True Story of the World's Worst Nuclear Disaster [Audiobook] by Andrew Leatherbarrow, read by Michael Page
2016 | MP3@320 kbps + EPUB | 6 hrs 24 mins | 881MB

At 01:23:40 on April 26th 1986, Alexander Akimov pressed the emergency shutdown button at Chernobyl’s fourth nuclear reactor. It was an act that forced the permanent evacuation of a city, killed thousands and crippled the Soviet Union. The event spawned decades of conflicting, exaggerated and inaccurate stories.

This book, the result of five years of research, presents an accessible but comprehensive account of what really happened. From the desperate fight to prevent a burning reactor core from irradiating eastern Europe, to the self-sacrifice of the heroic men who entered fields of radiation so strong that machines wouldn’t work, to the surprising truth about the legendary ‘Chernobyl divers’, all the way through to the USSR’s final show-trial. The historical narrative is interwoven with a story of the author’s own spontaneous journey to Ukraine’s still-abandoned city of Pripyat and the wider Chernobyl Zone.

Complete with over 45 pages of photographs of modern-day Pripyat and technical diagrams of the power station, Chernobyl 01:23:40 is a fascinating new account of the world’s worst nuclear disaster.

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