The Divine Comedy [Audiobook]

The Divine Comedy [Audiobook]

The Divine Comedy [Audiobook] by Dante Alighieri
Blackstone Audiobooks | 1991 | ISBN: 078610256X | MP3@112 kbps | 13 hrs 33 mins | 652.38MB


The historical and cultural significance of Dante Alighieri's masterpiece The Divine Comedy cannot be overstated. Dante s poetry takes the reader on a multi-layered journey, one through which he or she experiences this literary master's unique aesthetic and spiritual sensibilities. The Divine Comedy also presents the opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of medieval Italian thought and its bearing on Western theology and culture. This lyrical allegory of a journey from the depths of Hell to Paradise is a moving read in its own right and its influence upon world literature unchallenged.


Dante Alighieri was born in 1265 in Florence. His family, of minor nobility, was not wealthy nor especially distinguished; his mother died when he was a child, his father before 1283. At about the age of 20 he married Gemma Donati, by whom he had three children. Little is known of Dante's formal education-it is likely to have included study with the Dominicans, the Augustinians, and the Franciscans in Florence, and at the university in Bologna. In 1295 he entered Florentine politics and in the summer of 1300 he became one of the six governing Priors of Florence. In 1301, the political situation forced Dante and his party into exile. For the rest of his life he wandered through Italy, perhaps studied at Paris, while depending for refuge on the generosity of various nobles. He continued to write and at some point late in life he took asylum in Ravenna where he completed the Divine Commedia and died, much honoured, in 1321.




Carthage Must Be Destroyed [Audiobook]

Carthage Must Be Destroyed [Audiobook]

Carthage Must Be Destroyed: The Rise and Fall of an Ancient Civilization [Audiobook] by Richard Miles
Gildan Media | 2011 | ASIN: B005HUPOMW | MP3@64 kbps | 14 hrs 14 mins | 390.58MB


An epic history of a doomed civilization and a lost empire. The devastating struggle to the death between the Carthaginians and the Romans was one of the defining dramas of the ancient world. In an epic series of land and sea battles, both sides came close to victory before the Carthaginians finally succumbed and their capital city, history, and culture were almost utterly erased.


Drawing on a wealth of new archaeological research, Richard Miles vividly brings to life this lost empire-from its origins among the Phoenician settlements of Lebanon to its apotheosis as the greatest seapower in the Mediterranean. And at the heart of the history of Carthage lies the extraordinary figure of Hannibal-the scourge of Rome and one of the greatest military leaders, but a man who also unwittingly led his people to catastrophe. The first full-scale history of Carthage in decades, Carthage Must Be Destroyed reintroduces modern listeners to the larger-than-life historical players and the ancient glory of this almost forgotten civilization.


In the Wake of the Plague [Audiobook]

In the Wake of the Plague [Audiobook]

In the Wake of the Plague: The Black Death and the World It Made [Audiobook]
Recorded Books | 2003 | ASIN: B0000D1BXM | MP3@128 kbps | 6 hrs 30 mins | 356.48MB


Much of what we know about the greatest medical disaster ever, the Black Plague of the fourteenth century, is wrong. The details of the Plague etched in the minds of terrified schoolchildren – the hideous black welts, the high fever, and the final, awful end by respiratory failure – are more or less accurate. But what the Plague really was, and how it made history, remain shrouded in a haze of myths.


Norman Cantor, the premier historian of the Middle Ages, draws together the most recent scientific discoveries and groundbreaking historical research to pierce the mist and tell the story of the Black Death afresh, as a gripping, intimate narrative.


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