Titan II: A History of a Cold War Missile [Audiobook]

Titan II: A History of a Cold War Missile [Audiobook]
Titan II: A History of a Cold War Missile [Audiobook] by David Stumpf, read by Douglas R Pratt
2014 | MP3@56 kbps | 12 hrs 5 mins | 332.8MB

A comprehensive study of the missile system that formed a critical component of the United States' nuclear arsenal.

The Titan II ICBM (intercontinental ballistic missile) program was developed by the United States military to bolster the size, strength, and speed of the nation's strategic weapons arsenal in the 1950s and 1960s. Each missile carried a single warhead - the largest in U.S. inventory - used liquid fuel propellants, and was stored and launched from hardened underground silos. The missiles were deployed at basing facilities in Arkansas, Arizona, and Kansas and remained in active service for over 20 years. Since military deactivation in the early 1980s, the Titan II has served as a reliable satellite launch vehicle.

Titan II will be welcomed by professionals and laymen, and by the many civilian and Air Force personnel who were involved in the program - a deterrent weapons system that proved to be successful in defending America from nuclear attack.

The Murder of the Century: The Gilded Age Crime That Scandalized a City & Sparked the Tabloid Wars [Audiobook]

The Murder of the Century: The Gilded Age Crime That Scandalized a City & Sparked the Tabloid Wars [Audiobook]
The Murder of the Century: The Gilded Age Crime That Scandalized a City & Sparked the Tabloid Wars [Audiobook] by Paul Collins, read by William Dufris
2011 | MP3@96 kbps + EPUB | 9 hrs 43 mins | 398.4MB

In Long Island, a farmer found a duck pond turned red with blood. On the Lower East Side, two boys playing at a pier discovered a floating human torso wrapped tightly in oilcloth. Blueberry pickers near Harlem stumbled upon neatly severed limbs in an overgrown ditch. Clues to a horrifying crime were turning up all over New York, but the police were baffled: There were no witnesses, no motives, no suspects.

The grisly finds that began on the afternoon of June 26, 1897, plunged detectives headlong into the era's most perplexing murder. Seized upon by battling media moguls Joseph Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst, the case became a publicity circus. Re-creations of the murder were staged in Times Square, armed reporters lurked in the streets of Hell's Kitchen in pursuit of suspects, and an unlikely trio - an anxious cop, a cub reporter, and an eccentric professor - all raced to solve the crime. What emerged was a sensational love triangle and an even more sensational trial: an unprecedented capital case hinging on circumstantial evidence around a victim that the police couldn't identify with certainty - and that the defense claimed wasn't even dead.

The Murder of the Century is a rollicking tale - a rich evocation of America during the Gilded Age and a colorful re-creation of the tabloid wars that have dominated media to this day.

Lincoln and Chief Justice Taney: Slavery, Secession and the President's War Powers [Audiobook]

Lincoln and Chief Justice Taney: Slavery, Secession and the President's War Powers [Audiobook]
Lincoln and Chief Justice Taney: Slavery, Secession and the President's War Powers [Audiobook] by James F Simon, read by Richard Allen
2006 | MP3@64 kbps | 11 hrs 26 mins | 314.8MB
The clashes between President Abraham Lincoln and Chief Justice Roger B. Taney over slavery, secession, and Lincoln's constitutional war powers went to the heart of Lincoln's presidency. Lincoln and Taney's bitter disagreements began with Taney's Dred Scott opinion in 1857, when the chief justice declared that the Constitution did not grant the black man any rights that the white man was bound to honor. Lincoln attacked the opinion as a warped judicial interpretation of the Framers' intent and accused Taney of being a member of a pro-slavery national conspiracy. In his first inaugural address, Lincoln insisted that the South had no legal right to secede. Taney, who administered the oath of office to Lincoln, believed that the South's secession was legal and in the best interests of both sections of the country. Once the war began, Lincoln broadly interpreted his constitutional powers as commander-in-chief to prosecute the war, suspending habeas corpus, censoring the press, and allowing military courts to try civilians for treason. Taney vociferously disagreed, accusing Lincoln of assuming dictatorial powers in violation of the Constitution. Lincoln ignored Taney's protests and exercised his presidential authority fearlessly, determined that he would preserve the Union. James F. Simon skillfully brings to life this compelling story of the momentous tug-of-war between the president and the chief justice during the worst crisis in the nation's history.
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