Al Capone and the 1933 World's Fair: The End of the Gangster Era in Chicago [Audiobook]

Al Capone and the 1933 World's Fair: The End of the Gangster Era in Chicago [Audiobook]
Al Capone and the 1933 World's Fair: The End of the Gangster Era in Chicago [Audiobook] by William Elliott Hazelgrove, read by Chris Andrew Ciulla
2017 | MP3@64 kbps | 8 hrs 59 mins | 251.24MB

Al Capone and the 1933 World's Fair is a historical look at Chicago during the darkest days of the Great Depression - the story of Chicago fighting the hold that organized crime had on the city to be able to put on the 1933 World's Fair.

William Elliott Hazelgrove provides the exciting and sprawling history behind the 1933 World's Fair, the last of the golden age. He reveals the story of the six millionaire businessmen, dubbed The Secret Six, who beat Al Capone at his own game, ending the gangster era as prohibition was repealed. The story of an intriguing woman, Sally Rand, who embodied the World's Fair with her own rags to riches story and brought sex into the open. The story of Rufus and Charles Dawes, who gave the fair a theme and then found financing in the worst economic times the country had ever experienced. The story of the most corrupt mayor of Chicago, William Thompson, who owed his election to Al Capone; and the mayor who followed him, Anton Cermak, who was murdered months before the fair was opened by an assassin many said was hired by Al Capone.

But, most of all, it's a story about a city fighting for survival in the darkest of times; and a shining light of hope called A Century of Progress.

MacArthur's Spies: The Soldier, the Singer, and the Spymaster Who Defied the Japanese in World War II [Audiobook]

MacArthur's Spies: The Soldier, the Singer, and the Spymaster Who Defied the Japanese in World War II [Audiobook]
MacArthur's Spies: The Soldier, the Singer, and the Spymaster Who Defied the Japanese in World War II [Audiobook] by Peter Eisner, read by the Author
2017 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 12 hrs 39 mins | 348.4MB

A thrilling story of espionage, daring, and deception set in the exotic landscape of occupied Manila during World War II.

On January 2, 1942, Japanese troops marched into Manila unopposed by US forces. Manila was a strategic port, a romantic American outpost, and a jewel of a city. Tokyo saw its conquest of the Philippines as the key in its plan to control all of Asia, including Australia. Thousands of soldiers surrendered and were sent on the notorious 80-mile Bataan Death March. But thousands of other Filipinos and Americans refused to surrender and hid in the Luzon hills above Bataan and Manila. MacArthur's Spies is the story of three of them and how they successfully foiled the Japanese for more than two years, sabotaging Japanese efforts and preparing the way for MacArthur's return.

From a jungle hideout, Colonel John Boone, an enlisted American soldier, led an insurgent force of Filipino fighters who infiltrated Manila as workers and servants to stage demolitions and attacks.

"Chick" Parsons, an American businessman, polo player, and expatriate in Manila, was also a US Navy intelligence officer. He escaped in the guise of a Panamanian diplomat and returned as MacArthur's spymaster, coordinating the guerrilla efforts with the planned Allied invasion.

And finally there was Claire Phillips, an itinerant American torch singer with many names and almost as many husbands. Her nightclub in Manila served as a cover for supplying food to Americans in the hills and to thousands of prisoners of war. She and the men and women who worked with her gathered information from the collaborating Filipino businessmen; the homesick, English-speaking Japanese officers; and the spies who mingled in the crowd.

Fans of Alan Furst and Ben Macintyre - and anyone who loves Casablanca - will relish this true tale of heroism when it counted the most.

The First World War [Audiobook]

The First World War [Audiobook]
The First World War [Audiobook] by Hew Strachan, read by Clive Chafer
2017 | MP3@64 kbps + AZW3 | 13 hrs 40 mins | 376.0MB

Nearly a century has passed since the outbreak of World War I, yet as military historian Hew Strachan (winner of the 2016 Pritzker Literature Award) argues in this brilliant and authoritative new book, the legacy of the “war to end all wars” is with us still. The First World War was a truly global conflict from the start, with many of the most decisive battles fought in or directly affecting the Balkans, Africa, and the Ottoman Empire. Even more than World War II, the First World War continues to shape the politics and international relations of our world, especially in hot spots like the Middle East and the Balkans.

Strachan has done a masterful job of reexamining the causes, the major campaigns, and the consequences of the First World War, compressing a lifetime of knowledge into a single definitive volume tailored for the general reader. Written in crisp, compelling prose and enlivened with extraordinarily vivid photographs and detailed maps, The First World War re-creates this world-altering conflict both on and off the battlefield—the clash of ideologies between the colonial powers at the center of the war, the social and economic unrest that swept Europe both before and after, the military strategies employed with stunning success and tragic failure in the various theaters of war, the terms of peace and why it didn’t last.

Drawing on material culled from many countries, Strachan offers a fresh, clear-sighted perspective on how the war not only redrew the map of the world but also set in motion the most dangerous conflicts of today. Deeply learned, powerfully written, and soon to be released with a new introduction that commemorates the hundredth anniversary of the outbreak of the war, The First World War remains a landmark of contemporary history.

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