Gettysburg [Audiobook]

Gettysburg [Audiobook]
Gettysburg [Audiobook] by Stephen W Sears, read by Ed Sala
2003 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 23 hrs 9 mins | 634.21MB

A masterful, single-volume history of the Civil War's greatest campaign.

Drawing on original source material, from soldiers' letters to official military records of the war, Stephen W. Sears's Gettysburg is a remarkable and dramatic account of the legendary campaign. He takes particular care in his study of the battle's leaders and offers detailed analyses of their strategies and tactics, depicting both General Meade's heroic performance in his first week of army command and General Lee's role in the agonizing failure of the Confederate army. With characteristic style and insight, Sears brings the epic tale of the battle in Pennsylvania vividly to life.

Chancellorsville [Audiobook]

Chancellorsville [Audiobook]
Chancellorsville [Audiobook] by Stephen W Sears, read by Richard M Davidson
1997 | MP3@64 kbps | 23,25 hrs | 638.27MB

Many Civil War buffs have called the battle of Chancellorsville Robert E. Lee's greatest victory; Stephen W. Sears doesn't necessarily agree, and in this painstakingly researched book, he offers ample evidence that Lee had luck on his side in the battle. Lee was a great general all right, and his men did fight savagely. But the notion that Union General Joseph Hooker was inept is cast into doubt by Sears, who describes the action of Chancellorsville as most great battle books do--hour by hour.

This book is the finest rendition of the battle yet and an interesting thesis for Civil War discussion. Lee's penchant for aggressiveness and his faith in his troops as unbeatable may have worked at Chancellorsville, but Sears argues that these alone couldn't win the war. Lee learned this lesson too, a month later at Gettysburg.

The Venetians: A New History [Audiobook]

The Venetians: A New History [Audiobook]
The Venetians: A New History: From Marco Polo to Casanova [Audiobook] by Paul Strathern, read by Derek Perkins
2014 | MP3@128 kbps + EPUB | 13 hrs 30 mins | 742.64MB

The Republic of Venice was the first great economic, cultural, and naval power of the modern Western world.

After winning the struggle for ascendency in the late 13th century, the Republic enjoyed centuries of unprecedented glory and built a trading empire which at its apogee reached as far afield as China, Syria, and West Africa. This golden period only drew to an end with the Republic's eventual surrender to Napoleon.

The Venetians illuminates the character of the Republic during these illustrious years by shining a light on some of the most celebrated personalities of European history—Petrarch, Marco Polo, Galileo, Titian, Vivaldi, and Casanova. Frequently, though, these emblems of the city found themselves at odds with the Venetian authorities, who prized stability above all else, and were notoriously suspicious of any "cult of personality." Was this very tension perhaps the engine for the Republic's unprecedented rise?

Rich with biographies of some of the most exalted characters who have ever lived, The Venetians is a refreshing and authoritative new look at the history of the most evocative of city-states.

pages: 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205
*100: 100 200 300