A World on Edge: The End of the Great War and the Dawn of a New Age [Audiobook]

A World on Edge: The End of the Great War and the Dawn of a New Age [Audiobook]
A World on Edge: The End of the Great War and the Dawn of a New Age [Audiobook] by Daniel Schönpflug, read by Gerard Doyle
2018 | M4B@64 kbps + EPUB | 8 hours and 16 minutes | 225.35MB

A World on Edge is the story of the aftermath of World War I, a transformative time when a new world seemed possible - told from the vantage of people, famous and ordinary, who lived through the turmoil.

November 1918. The Great War has left Europe in ruins, but with the end of hostilities, a radical new start seems not only possible, but essential, even unavoidable. Unorthodox ideas light up the age: new politics, new societies, new art and culture, new thinking. The struggle to determine the future has begun.

Sculptor Käthe Kollwitz, whose son died in the war, is translating sorrow and loss into art. Captain Harry Truman is running a men's haberdashery in Kansas City, hardly expecting he will soon go bankrupt - and then become president of the US. Moina Michael is about to invent the "remembrance poppy", a symbol of sacrifice that will stand for generations to come. Meanwhile, Virginia Woolf is questioning whether that sacrifice was worth it, and George Grosz is so revolted by the violence on the streets of Berlin that he decides everything is meaningless.

For rulers and revolutionaries, a world of power and privilege is dying - while for others, a dream of overthrowing democracy is being born.

With novelistic virtuosity, Daniel Schönpflug describes this watershed time as it was experienced on the ground - open-ended, unfathomable, its outcome unclear. Combining a multitude of acutely observed details, Schönpflug shows listeners a world suspended between enthusiasm and disappointment, in which the window of opportunity was suddenly open, only to quickly close shut again.

The Spy and the Traitor: The Greatest Espionage Story of the Cold War [Audiobook]

The Spy and the Traitor: The Greatest Espionage Story of the Cold War [Audiobook]
The Spy and the Traitor: The Greatest Espionage Story of the Cold War [Audiobook] by Ben Macintyre, read by John Lee
2018 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 13 hours and 20 minutes | 366.53MB

The celebrated author of Double Cross and Rogue Heroes returns with his greatest spy story yet, a thrilling Americans-era tale of Oleg Gordievsky, the Russian whose secret work helped hasten the end of the Cold War.

If anyone could be considered a Russian counterpart to the infamous British double-agent Kim Philby, it was Oleg Gordievsky. The son of two KGB agents and the product of the best Soviet institutions, the savvy, sophisticated Gordievsky grew to see his nation's communism as both criminal and philistine. He took his first posting for Russian intelligence in 1968 and eventually became the Soviet Union's top man in London, but from 1973 on he was secretly working for MI6. For nearly a decade, as the Cold War reached its twilight, Gordievsky helped the West turn the tables on the KGB, exposing Russian spies and helping to foil countless intelligence plots, as the Soviet leadership grew increasingly paranoid at the United States's nuclear first-strike capabilities and brought the world closer to the brink of war. Desperate to keep the circle of trust close, MI6 never revealed Gordievsky's name to its counterparts in the CIA, which in turn grew obsessed with figuring out the identity of Britain's obviously top-level source. Their obsession ultimately doomed Gordievsky: the CIA officer assigned to identify him was none other than Aldrich Ames, the man who would become infamous for secretly spying for the Soviets.

Unfolding the delicious three-way gamesmanship between America, Britain, and the Soviet Union, and culminating in the gripping cinematic beat-by-beat of Gordievsky's nail-biting escape from Moscow in 1985, Ben Macintyre's latest may be his best yet. Like the greatest novels of John le Carré, it brings listeners deep into a world of treachery and betrayal, where the lines bleed between the personal and the professional, and one man's hatred of communism had the power to change the future of nations.

Eisenhower's Sputnik Moment: The Race for Space and World Prestige [Audiobook]

Eisenhower's Sputnik Moment: The Race for Space and World Prestige [Audiobook]
Eisenhower's Sputnik Moment: The Race for Space and World Prestige [Audiobook] by Yanek Mieczkowski, read by Douglas R Pratt
2018 | M4B@64 kbps | 13 hours and 39 minutes | 372.01MB

In a critical Cold War moment, Dwight D. Eisenhower's presidency suddenly changed when the Soviet Union launched Sputnik, the world's first satellite. What Ike called "A small ball" became a source of Russian pride and propaganda, and it wounded him politically, as critics charged that he responded sluggishly to the challenge of space exploration. Yet Eisenhower refused to panic after Sputnik - and he did more than just stay calm. He helped to guide the US into the Space Age, even though Americans have given greater credit to John F. Kennedy for that achievement.

In Eisenhower's Sputnik Moment, Yanek Mieczkowski examines the early history of America's space program, reassessing Eisenhower's leadership. He details how Eisenhower approved breakthrough satellites, supported a new civilian space agency, signed a landmark science education law, and fostered improved relations with scientists. Yet Sputnik also altered the world's power dynamics, sweeping Eisenhower in directions that were new, even alien, to him, and he misjudged the importance of space in the Cold War's "prestige race".

Offering a fast-paced account of this Cold War episode, Mieczkowski demonstrates that Eisenhower built an impressive record in space and on earth.

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