The Malaria Project: The U.S. Government's Secret Mission to Find a Miracle Cure [Audiobook]

The Malaria Project: The U.S. Government's Secret Mission to Find a Miracle Cure [Audiobook]
The Malaria Project: The US Government's Secret Mission to Find a Miracle Cure [Audiobook] by Karen M Masterson, read by Kimberly Farr
2014 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 16 hrs 39 mins | 457.72MB

A fascinating and shocking historical exposé, The Malaria Project is the story of America's secret mission to combat malaria during World War II - a campaign modeled after a German project which tested experimental drugs on men gone mad from syphilis.

American war planners, foreseeing the tactical need for a malaria drug, recreated the German model, then grew it tenfold. Quickly becoming the biggest and most important medical initiative of the war, the project tasked dozens of the country's top research scientists and university labs to find a treatment to remedy half a million U.S. troops incapacitated by malaria.

Spearheading the new U.S. effort was Dr. Lowell T. Coggeshall, whose persistent drive and curiosity led him to become one of the most innovative thinkers in solving the malaria problem. He recruited private corporations and the nation's best chemists out of Harvard and Johns Hopkins to make novel compounds that skilled technicians tested on birds. Giants in the field of clinical research, including the future NIH director James Shannon, then tested the drugs on mental health patients and convicted criminals - including infamous murderer Nathan Leopold.

By 1943, a dozen strains of malaria brought home in the veins of sick soldiers were injected into these human guinea pigs for drug studies. After hundreds of trials and many deaths, they found their "magic bullet", but not in a U.S. laboratory. America 's best weapon against malaria, still used today, was captured in battle from the Nazis. Called chloroquine, it went on to save more lives than any other drug in history.

Karen M. Masterson, a journalist turned malaria researcher, uncovers the complete story behind this dark tale of science, medicine, and war. Illuminating, riveting and surprising, The Malaria Project captures the ethical perils of seeking treatments for disease while ignoring the human condition.

Culloden: Scotland's Last Battle and the Forging of the British Empire [Audiobook]

Culloden: Scotland's Last Battle and the Forging of the British Empire [Audiobook]
Culloden: Scotland's Last Battle and the Forging of the British Empire [Audiobook] by Trevor Royle, read by Tim Bruce
2017 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 11 hrs 23 mins | 313.81MB

The Battle of Culloden in 1746 has gone down in history as the last major battle fought on British soil: a vicious confrontation between the English Royal Army and the Scottish forces supporting the Stuart claim to the throne. But this wasn't just a conflict between the Scots and the English: The battle was also part of a much larger campaign to protect the British Isles from the growing threat of a French invasion.

In Trevor Royle's vivid and evocative narrative, we are drawn into the ranks, on both sides, alongside doomed Jacobites fighting fellow Scots dressed in the red coats of the Duke of Cumberland's Royal Army. And we meet the Duke himself, a skilled warrior who would gain notoriety because of the reprisals on Highland clans in the battle's aftermath. Royle also takes us beyond the battle as the men of the Royal Army, galvanized by its success at Culloden, expand dramatically and start to fight campaigns overseas in America and India in order to secure British interests. We see the revolutionary use of fighting techniques first implemented at Culloden, and we see the creation of professional fighting forces.

67 Shots: Kent State and the End of American Innocence [Audiobook]

67 Shots: Kent State and the End of American Innocence [Audiobook]
67 Shots: Kent State and the End of American Innocence [Audiobook] by Howard Means, read by Alan Sklar
2016 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 9 hrs 59 mins | 274.98MB

At midday on May 4, 1970, after three days of protests, several thousand students and the Ohio National Guard faced off at opposite ends of the grassy campus commons at Kent State University. At noon, the Guard moved out. Twenty-four minutes later, Guardsmen launched a 13-second, 67-shot barrage that left four students dead and nine wounded, one paralyzed for life. The story doesn't end there, though. A horror of far greater proportions was narrowly averted minutes later when the Guard and students reassembled on the commons.

The Kent State shootings were both unavoidable and preventable: unavoidable in that all the discordant forces of a turbulent decade flowed together on May 4, 1970, on one Ohio campus; preventable in that every party to the tragedy made the wrong choices at the wrong time in the wrong place.

Using the university's recently available oral-history collection supplemented by extensive new interviewing, Means tells the story of this iconic American moment through the eyes and memories of those who were there, and skillfully situates it in the context of a tumultuous era.

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